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Brooch: Plum Blossom, 2015

Wood, rice, silver, lacquer, 8 x 2 x 14cm

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Brooch: Blue Thistle, 2015

Hanji( traditional korean paper), rice, ebony, water color, porcelain pigment, nail polish, 9 x 6 x 11 cm

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Brooch: Hide and Seek, 2015

Hanji(traditional korean paper), rice, found glass, amethyst, oxidized silver, water color, acrylic color, 6 x 5 x 8cm

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Brooch: Eat It or Wear It, 2015

Hanji( traditional korean paper), rice, ebony, oxidized silver, brass, nail polish 4 x 4 x 11 cm

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Brooch: Lotus, 2015

Rice, paper, found wood, aventurine, oxidized silver, water color, 6 x 4 x 10 cm

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Brooch: Untitled, 2015

Hanji( traditional korean paper), rice, beans, silver, wood, lacquer, 11 x 6 x 10 cm

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Brooch: Black with Black, 2015

Hanji( traditional korean paper), rice, ebony, oxidized silver, lacquer, obsidian, 10 x 5 x 7 cm

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Brooch: Pink Daisy, 2015

Hanji(traditional korean paper), rice, oxidized silver, purple heart wood, acrylic color, 6 x 3 x 9 cm

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Brooch: Rutile Vase, 2015

Rice, purple heart wood, coral, rutile quartz, oxidized silver, keum-boo (24k Gold Foil), water color, 6.6 x 5 x 10 cm

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Brooch: Untitled, 2015

Hanji( traditional korean Paper), rice, wood, oxidized silver, nail nolish, 10 x 2 x 15 cm

Born in Seoul, South Korea. In 2005 studied Bachelor of Arts at Hong-Ik University, Metal Art and Design in Seoul, South Korea. In 2012 studied Bachelor of Arts at Fachhochschule Düsseldorf, Applied Art and Design, Germany. In 2015 graduated Master of Fine Arts University of Applied Sciences Trier, Gemstones and Jewellery, Idar-Oberstein. Lives and works in Pforzheim, Germany.

Every day we are surrounded by and interact with countless objects. What are they and why they are so commonplace that we sometimes not notice them? Although we neglect them easily, they help us to live our lives more comfortably, easily and elegantly. They are so intimate with our daily life, that we often loose recognition of their existence. We become aware them only by our needs or by sense of absence when they are gone.

Beyond the consideration of preciousness and non-preciousness, we need to question how the material can act storage of ideas. The ideas might not only be focused on gold and silver, but also can be with things that surround us daily and how these materials can be alternatively considered. Without the restraints of high value materials there is the freedom to face the common perceptions about jewelry. Jewelry itself has a great value, but mostly this value depends on what materials it is made of.

But I think jewelry can be made from any other materials such as natural and man-made materials, wood, stone, glass and metals and so on. I am from the culture, where the jewelry is just focused on money. People generally don’t perceive jewelry conceptionally as a tool of expression but as financial property. The people’s imprinted thinking is that jewelry is supposed to be made of precious metal and decorated with gemstones. This has made people hesitant to explore the use of various ingredient within material.

For that reason, I was always questioning if the material is not conventional how can it create a value in the eye of the wearer or viewer? If a piece of jewelry is not ‘precious’ in the traditional way, then what is it that attracts us to it and still are thy valuable?

For example, when people think about rice and beans, the first thing that comes to mind is food-not adornment, not gold or silver. These grains are important for our nourishment and survival. To me, they have a sort of beauty to them.

The purpose of my pieces are for viewer or wearer may appreciate values beyond the material. My practical works are made with rice, beans, found objects, paper and silver. One is clearly perceived as more valuable than the other. This will indeed lead contrasting combination to the wearer and everything that is valuable or not, in our perception, becomes valuable in a variety of way. - Saerom Kong

Saerom Kong

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Cecilia, 2015

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UNSEEN, 2016

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Sveta, 2014

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Deux hommes, 2015

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Kyungil Park is a photographer, art director, and lecturer specializing in conceptual fashion and advertising photography. A graduate of Parsons School of Design, he returned to Seoul from New York in 1995, where his work has since appeared in Korean Vogue, Happer’s Bazaar, Elle, W and other magazines.

Kyungil Park has been commissioned to produce digital images for various commercial campaigns and projects. Most of his work is provocative and surreal. His obsession with sexuality is dubbed by observers as “Porno-Chic”. He currently teaches fashion photography at the Sang Myung Graduate School and lectures on commercial photography.

Kyungil Park

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Hong san, 2016, Encre de Chine et acrylique, 13 4/5 × 16 1/10 in; 35 × 41 cm

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Pour mieux dormir, 2016, Encre de Chine et crayon de couleur, 6 3/10 × 9 2/5 in; 16 × 24 cm

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La fin de la journée, 2014, Indian ink, watercolour, acrylic and colour pencil on paper, 7 9/10 × 7 9/10 in; 20 × 20 cm

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Île 1, 2015, Indian ink, watercolour and acrylic on paper, 16 3/10 × 19 7/10 in; 41.5 × 50 cm

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Migrateur, 2015, Indian ink and acrylic on paper, 10 × 12 1/5 in; 25.5 × 31 cm

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Jung Yeon Min’s works are highly imaginative and rich. One finds multiple worlds, the extraordinary and the realistic, notions of micro and macro, and manipulations of space and time in her work. Specifically, her work offers two equal but divergent investigations. On the one hand, she envisions and explores a mysterious and fantastical world. In a separate but concurrent investigation, she examines the effect of time in the pictorial realm. Sometimes colliding, these two points of inquiry form an intriguing basis for a closer reading of Min’s works as opening up places of potential and possibility.

In the realm between the real and the virtual her paintings present imaginary worlds asking us to search for their specific force, their capacity for rupturing and transforming life. Tracing this force within her works offers an understanding of what her artwork achieves and her vision of our potential. Understanding her virtual world involves questioning the very possibilities of life. Min does not want us to see her worlds simply as familiar experiences; while she uses perspective as a technique to produce a sense of comfort and familiarity, she jolts us with a sense of the strange at the same time.

Her paintings show Min’s integration of the familiar world with that of the strange. While she uses perspective to demarcate the division between the world that we know and the virtual world, she emphasizes seeing strangeness in an environment that is known and safe. By displaying various perspectives of time and temporality in many of her works, she seems to interrogate the concept of time and its effects. We are left questioning, what in the painting is waiting for a transformation to occur?

Min never settles this question for us, leaving us unsettled about what exactly we are supposed to seeing, what we are supposed to be waiting for. Thus, she disturbs our conventional understanding of time as a progression, from one event or occurrence to another, to a more multi-layered perspective. The presence of realism allows the fantastical world to make sense, so what would otherwise seem strange becomes familiar and inviting. She disarms resistance to this otherness, change and difference. Her worlds offer a way of being that breaks out of boundaries, both geographical and temporal, and that challenges us to envision a life beyond convention.

Jung Yeon Min







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