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ROLL OUT THE FUTURE OLED TV R9, The Rollable OLED: A Revolutionary TV

The Rollable OLED opens a new horizon of the future of TV . The product is coming as an actual product in 2019.

This Revolutionary TV, unveiled at CES 2019, will deliver a new sense of life with its leading-edge technology. The screen disappears without a trace, only leaving behind a true piece of art.

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Featuring a revolutionary rollable OLED display, the new LG TV R can hide itself into a base like a digital scroll from the future.

The display at CES featured rollable TVs in a format similar to what you might have in your living room in the future (though you might have just one, rather than five next to each other). We already had a taste of this model at CES 2018, and one of the most interesting features was its ability to change size with the touch of the button.

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Interior designers hate large TVs, and rightfully so: most of the time they’re just huge black frames that disrupt a carefully balanced setting, battling for space with other non-flat and better-looking pieces of furniture. LG’s new TV R, just unveiled at CES 2019, might be the right solution for such an annoying first-world problem: thanks to LG’s flexible OLED technology, the 65” TV R’s screen can roll itself into a nicely designed sideboard-like base, to be un-rolled only when needed to actually watch TV.

Even when the screen is completely tucked away, the base can play music and understand voice commands. After teasing a prototype of the TV R last year, LG announced this week that it will hit the shelves next spring.

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You can adjust the aspect ratio to allow for specific cinematic experiences, with Full View, Line View and Zero View options. With full view, you can see the full extent of contrast, depth and realism which is standard with all LG TVs.

You can also get support from Amazon Alexa and even with Apple AirPlay 2 and HomeKit. Line View, meanwhile, show things like the time, mood, music selections and even frame mode which shows your favourite photos. Or, you can let the TV roll all the way into the box and forget it even exists with Zero view.

LG Electronics

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World Premier : Frankfurt International Motor Show (September 2017)

Gregory Guillaume, chief designer for Kia Motors Europe, commented: “With many European drivers now seeking performance alternatives to the three-door hot hatch, we began thinking about a different halo model for the cee’d family.

“The Proceed Concept represents a bold new vision of how the vibrant soul of the pro_cee’d could be reincarnated and revitalised for a new generation of performance-oriented drivers.”

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A high-performance statement in aesthetics, the Proceed Concept is striking from any angle. The interior is designed with the future in mind, with a luxurious and stylish cockpit playing host to a full suite of advanced features designed to enrich your driving experience. It isn’t all about the looks though; the extended hot hatch is meant to maximize functionality. The athletic appearance is enhanced by other sensory experiences that extend even to the driver’s sense of smell; it is a truly stunning vehicle in every way.

Frankfurt, 7 September 2017 – Kia Motors has revealed new images of the Proceed Concept. Kia’s new concept car makes its world debut at the 2017 Frankfurt International Motor Show on 12 September.

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Designed at Kia’s European design centre in Frankfurt, just 500 metres from where it will be unveiled, the Proceed Concept indicates what the next-generation cee’d could look like.

The concept presents a new body type for Kia. The extended hot hatch retains the athleticism of the current pro_cee’d model, while combining its striking visual presence with a dash of real-world versatility. Reworked and reimagined for a new generation of driver, it puts forward a bold vision for a potential member of the next-generation cee’d family.

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Gregory Guillaume, Chief Designer Europe for Kia Motors, commented: “With many European drivers now seeking performance alternatives to the three-door hot hatch, we began thinking about a different halo model for the cee’d family. The Proceed Concept represents a bold new vision of how the vibrant soul of the pro_cee’d could be reincarnated and revitalised for a new generation of performance-oriented drivers.”

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Low, lean and lithe, the Proceed Concept’s rakish roofline, muscular proportions and compact footprint hint at its outright agility. The silhouette of the car is complemented by a series of distinctive design cues. A dynamic window frame follows the roofline to the rear tailgate, while the striking ‘Sharkblade’ in the bodywork, complete with GT logo, reinforces its lack of B-pillars. Lateral strakes exaggerate the Proceed Concept’s slim waistline and lend an air of muscularity to the rear of the car. It runs on six-spoke aluminium alloy wheels, 20 inches in diameter.

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Where daytime running lights have become a key element in a car’s identity, the Proceed Concept uses light in other ways. The concept features a ‘Luminline’ – an illuminated outline of the car’s glasshouse that greets drivers as they approach the car. This serves as a powerful nocturnal visual identifier for the Proceed Concept, highlighting its fastback shape. The concept’s dramatic roofline flows into a tailgate characterised by its stacked air vents, and the rippled surface of a rear light strip inspired by molten ferromagnetic metal.

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Its stance and proportions may be new, but the Proceed Concept features many of Kia’s now familiar design motifs. The iconic ‘tiger nose’ grille, the sculpted ‘island’ bonnet inspired by the Stinger, the castellated windscreen, the full-length roof glazing, and Kia’s inimitable mix of curvaceous sheetmetal and taut creases. Each element singles out the Proceed Concept as a truly modern Kia.

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The concept is finished in bespoke ‘Lava Red’ paintwork. This has been created by combining multiple hand-applied layers of black, chrome-effect silver, and red-tinted lacquer for a glossy, lustrous paint finish.

Kia will unveil the Proceed Concept on 12 September on the Kia stand, located in Hall 9 of the Frankfurt Messe exhibition centre.

KIA

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MVRDV has completed construction on The Imprint, a new 2-building art-entertainment complex in close proximity to Seoul’s Incheon Airport. Featuring a nightclub in one building and indoor theme park in the other, the windowless structures feature three key design elements: imprints of the façade features of surrounding buildings, lifted entrances, and a golden entrance spot covering one corner of the nightclub building.

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MVRDV’s The Imprint is part of the larger Paradise City complex of 6 buildings in total, which will provide a full suite of entertainment and hotel attractions less than a kilometre away from South Korea’s largest airport.

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Given the proposed programme of the 2 buildings – a nightclub and indoor theme park – the client required a design with no windows, yet one that still integrated with the other buildings in the complex. The design of The Imprint therefore arises from a simple question: can we design an expressive façade that connects with its surroundings even though it has no windows?

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The design achieves this by projecting the façades of the surrounding buildings in the complex, which are ‘draped’ over the simple building forms and plazas like a shadow, and ‘imprinted’ as a relief pattern onto the façades.

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“By placing, as it were, surrounding buildings into the facades of our buildings and in the central plaza, we connect The Imprint with the neighbours,” says Winy Maas, principal and co-founder of MVRDV. “This ensures coherence. Paradise City is not a collection of individual objects such as Las Vegas, but a real city.”

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In order to achieve the desired ‘imprint’ of the surrounding buildings, the façade of The Imprint is constructed of glass-fibre reinforced concrete panels. As many of the 3,869 panels are unique, the construction required moulds to be individually produced using MVRDV’s 3D modelling files from the design phase. Once installed, these panels were painted white in order to emphasise the relief in the design.

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As Winy Maas explains: “Two months ago most of the cladding was done and client said, ‘this is an art piece. What is interesting about that is that they are looking for that momentum—that entertainment can become art or that the building can become artistic in that way. What, then, is the difference between architecture an art? The project plays with that and I think that abstraction is part of it, but it has to surprise, seduce and it has to calm down.”

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Architects : MVRDV Location : 186, Yeongjonghaeannam-ro 321beon-gil, Jung-gu, Incheon, South Korea Principal-in-charge : Winy Maas, Jacob van Rijs Partner : Wenchian Shi Design Team : María López Calleja with Daehee Suk, Xiaoting Chen, Kyosuk Lee, Guang Ruey Tan, Stavros Gargaretas, Mafalda Rangel, Dong Min Lee Area : 9800.0 m2 Project Year : 2018 Photographs : Ossip van Duivenbode Co-Architect : GANSAM Architects & Partners, South Korea Facade Consultant : VS-A Group Ltd Panelization Consultant : WITHWORKS GFRC : Techwall
 Lighting : L’Observatoire International

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The golden spot is the project’s most obvious and attention-grabbing expressive element, even catching the eyes of passengers coming in to land at Incheon Airport. The golden colour is achieved simply, by using gold paint instead of white, and is reinforced by the lighting of the facades at night: while the majority of the façade is lit from below, the gold spot is highlighted from above.“Even in the night, visitors from abroad, landing in Incheon, are welcomed by this ray of light”, says Maas.

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The entrances, where the façades are lifted like a curtain to reveal mirrored ceilings and glass media floors, exude a sense of the excitement happening inside. “Reflection and theatricality are therefore combined,” concludes Maas. “With our design, after the nightly escapades, a zen-like silence follows during the day, providing an almost literally reflective situation for the after parties. Giorgio de Chirico would have liked to paint it, I think."

MVRDV is a Rotterdam, Netherlands-based architecture and urban design practice founded in 1993. The name is an acronym for the founding members: Winy Maas (1959), Jacob van Rijs (1964) and Nathalie de Vries (1965). Maas and Van Rijs worked at OMA, De Vries at Mecanoo before starting MVRDV.

MVRDV







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