User inserted image

Metronome Wings

“The contrast between metal structural form and natural feather, together with the repetitive and whimsical movements of fragile wings, provokes the imagination and evolves the intimate relationship between work and viewer/wearer.” Intrigued by machines and their movements, mechanical structure has become the most crucial formal language throughout my body of work. Mechanical structure as a form fascinates me in two aspects. First, structural form can achieve complexity yet simplicity at once because of the ingrained logic behind it.

Additionally, mechanical forms involve movement that is not random, but rather is designed or devised, and thus can be interactive. Working in particular with mechanical movements that interact with and involve viewers allows me to give vitality to objects. My wearable/kinetic works are intended to exist between jewelry and sculpture. They stand independently while their close connection to the body creates an intimate relationship with the viewer.

User inserted image

MEASURE RING WHEEL This series originate from my fascination with geared wheels and is intended to create a kinetic ring that functions as a small-scale measuring tool.

These kinetic rings are designed and fabricated with precisely calculated gears and wheels. When the wearer rolls the primary wheel along a surface it measures length, which then can be read by the two hands on the top dial. Similar to the movement of a clock, the shorter hand indicates ten centimeters, the longer hand is used for one centimeter, while the tick marks on the wheel allow the length to also be measured in millimeters.These are kinetic rings, small sculptures, measuring tools and simply, enjoyable toys.

The parts of the ring were created in different ways: the gears were originally machined and reproduced by casting, some other elements were first made by rapid prototyping and then cast, while other parts were fabricated by hand. The tick marks and numbers were engraved by laser.

User inserted imageUser inserted image

Kinetic Rings with Wings - As nature has been an inspiration to so many artists, the machine was my inspiration, growing up in a soil-less megacity. Perceiving the machine as a replacement or extension of nature, or mechanical form as a way of understanding nature, is the fundamental idea beneath my series of kinetic jewelry and sculpture, Wings. Flapping wings on the tip of a finger or the end of a ticking metronome pendulum evokes emotional connections similar to those that I find from birds, insects, or humans in the mechanized world.

Mechanical structure also fascinates me as a formal language. It is form for purpose rather than for a subjective reason, which ironically is the most fundamental rule of natural forms, so it achieves pure and coherent form even through the most complicated mechanism. It is also an ultimate abstraction achieved through perfection. My kinetic work is born as a machine yet exists solely for itself. It then earns its wildness and lives untamed as I desire myself.

User inserted imageUser inserted image

Dukno Yoon, a metalsmith and jeweler from Kansas creates spectacular rings, bracelets, metronomes, and other machines that mimic the movements of flying birds.

User inserted imageUser inserted image

Dukno Yoon received a MFA in metalsmithing and jewelry at Miami University in Ohio and a BFA at Kookmin University in Seoul, Korea. Yoon explores movements and mechanical structure as form to create small kinetic sculptures and wearable form.

His artwork has been exhibited in Korea, Japan, Australia and the United States. His career as a metal artist/designer also includes costume production of crowns, armor and metal masks for several TV shows by major broadcasting companies in Korea.

He has also received several international awards and federal grants in Korea and has been featured and included in numerous publications. He is currently an Assistant Professor and the Area Coordinator of metalsmithing and jewelry at Kansas State University.

Dukno Yoon

User inserted image

The Lantern - The literal and mythological meaning of the lantern is highly significant throughout Asian history—it leads you through the dark, showing you the way and indicating the beginning and end of a journey. Neri&Hu’s radical transformation of an existing five storey building in Seoul, South Korea, into a grand flagship store for leading Asian skincare brand Sulwhasoo is inspired by these notions of the lantern.

User inserted imageUser inserted image

The building was designed by Korean architect IROJE and built in 2003. Celebrating the roots of the brand, Neri&Hu wanted to develop a concept with strong connections to Asian culture and traditions, ultimately allowing customers to discover the wealth of Asian wisdom that underpins the Sulwhasoz ethos.

User inserted image User inserted image

The concept originates from three key points that were defined at the very start of the project - Identity, Journey and Memory. Neri&Hu aspired to create a space that appeals to all the senses, that captures the customer immediately as they approach the building, creates an experience that continues to unfold during the journey through the store, and leaves a strong impression with visitors long after they have left.

User inserted image

This is what led to the lantern concept, where a continuous brass structure is the element ties the whole store together, guiding customers while they explore the full extent of the space.

User inserted image

In creating a series of voids and openings in the building, visitors fully experience the structure as it moves through the space and envelops the different programs. Mirror volumes are inserted into a wooden landscape to reflect and amplify the seemingly endless structure.

User inserted image

The delicate structure rests upon a solid ground of wide timber floor boards that occasionally rises up to form wooden counters with inserted solid stone blocks, on top of which Sulwhasoo’s products are displayed as precious objects. While it is primarily a guiding mechanism, the lantern structure is also a source of light—hanging within it are custom light fixtures that turn the structure into the main attribute to frame and highlight the products on display.

User inserted image

Navigating through the five storeys, customers experience changes in atmosphere. The basement spa with its dark brick walls, earthy grey stone treatment rooms and warm crafted wood floors has a sense of intimacy and shelter for visitors. Moving up the building, the material palette becomes lighter and more open, inviting visitors to interact with the space, culminating finally in a roof terrace with its free-flowing brass structure canopy that frames vast views of the surrounding city.

User inserted image

The journey is a constant contradiction between two counterparts: enclosed to open, dark to light, delicate to massive.The holistic approach to the lantern concept—from space-making to lighting to display to signage—gives visitors a sense of endless intrigue and urges them to explore the spaces and products with passion and delight.

Architects : Neri&Hu Design and Research Office Location : 650, Sinsadong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul, South Korea Principals in Charge : Lyndon Neri & Rossana Hu Associate in Charge : Anne-Charlotte Wiklander Area : 1949.0 sqm Project Year : 2016 Photographs : Pedro Pegenaute Manufacturers : Flos, Fritz Hansen, Vitra, e15, Classicon, Roll&Hill, Dela Espada, Carl Hansen, Viabizzuno, Gandia Blasco, Serge Mouille, Mattiazzi, Labo, Kvadrat, Vola, Arne Jacobsen, Stellar works, Parachilna Designers : Sela Lim, Yinan Li, Kailun Sun Senior Associate - Product Design : Brian Lo Associate - Product Design : Nicolas Fardet Senior Associate - Graphic Design : Christine Neri Graphic Designers : Haiou Xin, Litien Poeng

Neri&Hu Design and Research Office

User inserted image

Consolation, 2003

The ceramic sculpture of SunKoo Yuh, who was born in South Korea in 1960 and immigrated to the United States in 1988, is composed of tight groupings of various forms including plants, animals, fish, and human figures. While Korean art and Buddhist and Confucian beliefs inform some aspects of his imagery, his work is largely driven by implied narratives that often suggest socio-political critiques. Yuh is currently Associate Professor at the University of Georgia, Athens, GA.

User inserted imageUser inserted image

Year Of Monkey, 2016, Porcelain, glazed, 55.9 × 40.6 × 33 cm

User inserted imageUser inserted image

Another Connection, 2006, Porcelain, Glaze, 50.8 × 40.6 × 38.1 cm

The Rubin Center has exhibited two monumental columns that showcase Yuh’s mastery of the complex narrative and of the ceramic medium. Yuh’s work is included in the collections of the Renwick Gallery at the Smithsonian in Washington, DC,The Philadelphia Museum of Art and The Museum of Fine Arts Houston, among others. Honors and Awards include the Joan Mitchell Foundation Grant, the Grand Prize at the 2nd World Ceramic Biennale International Competition, Icheon, Korea, The Elizabeth R. Raphael Founder’s Prize, and the Virginia A. Groot Foundation Grant.

User inserted image

Another Relationship, 2007

User inserted image User inserted image

New Year's Greeting, 2003, Porcelain, Glaze, 58.4 × 35.6 × 33 cm

My work is a means of transformation from interior images to tangible ceramic sculptures.I draw images intuitively and spontaneously with ink and brush.I study my drawings and select a few to transform into three-dimensional clay sculptures.

My work expresses my inner emotions, communicates about life, and directly draws from mundane experiences.I want to record my daily impressions through my works with the hope that it will lead me to small insights into my life and family.While making art may be a quest in search of broad meanings or answers, it may be expressed through intimate awareness of daily life.

User inserted image

Year of the Pig, 2008

User inserted image

Sunkoo Yuh (1960 – ) was born in South Korea, immigrated to the U.S. in 1988, and now serves as Professor of Art at the University of Georgia. He earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts at Hong Ik University in Seoul and Master of Fine Arts at New York State College of Ceramics. Yuh’s artwork earned the grand prize in the 2nd World Ceramic Biennale 2003 Korea International Competition.

User inserted image

Yuh creates ceramic sculptures comprising tight groupings of various forms including plants, animals, fish, and human figures. Korean art plus Buddhist, Christian, and Confucian iconography inform some aspects of his imagery but implied narratives that suggest a socio-political critique largely drive his work.

Yuh’s interest in German Expressionist painting is evident in the elongation of many of his figures and his unsettling spatial configurations. There is a post-apocalyptic sensibility to his sculptures communicated through his dense and dripping glaze (up to 40 layers), a technique that references Chinese Tang dynasty funerary sculptures, which Yuh admires.

Sunkoo Yuh







ⓒ copyrights 2003-2017 Designersparty, all rights reserved. all material published remains the exclusive copyright of Designersparty.