User inserted image

2018 FALL/WINTER

User inserted image

2017 FALL/WINTER

User inserted image

2016 SPRING/SUMMER

User inserted image

2015 SPRING/SUMMER

User inserted image

2014 FALL/WINTER

User inserted image

2013-2014 FALL/WINTER

User inserted image

2013 SPRING/SUMMER

User inserted image

2012-2013 FALL/WINTER

User inserted image

2011-2012 FALL/WINTER

User inserted image

2011 SPRING/SUMMER

User inserted image

2010-2011 FALL/WINTER

User inserted image

2010 SPRING/SUMMER

User inserted image

2009-2010 FALL/WINTER

User inserted image

2009 SPRING/SUMMER

A graduate of Esmod Seoul in 1992 JUUN.J has started his career as a designer for Chiffons. He was then named Creative Director for Club Monaco and NIX. In 1999, he launched his brand Lone Costume on the runway at Seoul Fashion Week. Since July 2007 JUUN. J has also been showing his collection in Paris, as part of the official calendar of Paris menswear. JUUN.J likes to create new silhouettes and garments with an overlapping of pieces creating a spectacular tension between them.

JUUN.J

User inserted image

Hyundai is apparently branching out into a very different kind of transportation. The Korean carmaker is developing a robotic exoskeleton that increases the wearer’s strength significantly.

Hyundai displays their mechanical exoskeleton suit prototype. The company’s suit is a dark-blue exoskeleton mech robot with a safety harness in it. The user can move the arms freely and the vast ‘alien style’ mechanical legs that have a tackle to position the feet into.

User inserted image

Hyundai is on a mission to manufacture fully mechanized suits that allows users to infuse robotics into everyday tasks. the hyundai exoskeleton can lift up to 50 kilograms over long distances and supervising super-human duties.

The progress being made is part of the company’s ‘next mobility’ project which plans to help paraplegics, the physically disabled and the elderly, as well as hyundai’s workers on the manufacturing line. similar programs by suitX, berkeley bionics and lockheed martin have made the news as well. with progress being made so quickly, by so many companies, exoskeletons have the possibility to be ready for mass production within the next decade.

User inserted image

Hyundai actually has some previous experience with robot suits. Last year, it unveiled the H-LEX “wearable walking assistant.” This was a much lighter-duty apparatus meant to help senior citizens walk. The company also showed a scaled-down version of its new exoskeleton, with leg pieces only, designed for a similar purpose. The larger version could be used by factory workers, who already use standalone robots to do their jobs.

User inserted image

"This wearable robot that we are developing for commercial purposes will be used in diverse areas," a company official said.

According to Hyundai, the suit can increase the productivity of the workers significantly and lower accidents that cause hip and knee injuries. It will be useful in a workplace where people needs to lift over a hundred of kilograms objects, they added. Similarly, the ‘wearable robot’ can also be used by soldiers to run long distances without breaking a sweat. Even they are carrying 50 kilograms of equipment.

User inserted image

"Such a robot development is in line with Hyundai Motor Group's vision for free mobility of people and things."

The company also aims that their technology will also help people with disabilities or limited mobility. Furthermore, the company offers an exoskeleton version that the civilians can wear which gives the user stability. The suit can help elders to walk around independently and also to be a part of the rehabilitation programs for the patients with injuries.

Hyundai Motor Group

User inserted image

Spring Collection 2017

In contrast to the exploration and curiosity of forms we had of making with Hot Wire Extensions, this a collection creating the most simple and basic structure using the process. Aimed for efficiency we used only straight lines and simple shapes that almost resembles scaffolding or basic wood work. However, when the object is finally solidified the simplest structure high-lights the smooth joints that the process creates in a very subtle way. Still containing the unique aesthetic of the process the objects connects with the audience through the friendly and familiar feeling of the objects which are the most basic archetypes of furniture.

User inserted image

Basic- and Random Stool 35 x 35 x 48 cm (2017) and 32 x 32 x 45 cm (2015)

User inserted imageUser inserted image

Grid Bench 2016 66 x 100 x 50 cm

Embracing the knowledge we have gained through the previous collection. We aimed this collection to have the playfulness of the random structure we have made before and the strict straight lines of the grid. The far off elements when designing and shaping an object comes together effortlessly and beautifully. The collection consists of three pieces highlighting the elements in each design

User inserted image

Random Table with Grid 2016 65 x 65 x 55 cm

User inserted imageUser inserted image

Wave Stool / Wave light 21 x 40 x 57 cm / 96 x 53 x 147 cm 2017

This is a playful series that contains geometric and controlled lines that can be created through a process. This collection, using curved wave lines and straight lines, shows you the imaginative figures that wires can easily make. This fun, but controlled form is made possible by our skilled craftsmanship of the process.

User inserted imageUser inserted image

12 Stools ‘12 - Hot Wire Extensions’ is a series of twelve stools exploring the structural potential of this process, showcasing the strength of the material and the flexibility of the process. Throughout its development, various methods and techniques of using the wire were discovered and successively refined. Each stool demonstrates a different approach, emphasising a particular technique of using the wire and composite

Hot Wire Extensions explores alternative processes of making and displays new potentials in industrial production by transforming line structures into solid bodies. The innovative manufacturing process reuses the waste nylon powder of SLS 3D printing. The process starts by building a shape from thin wire made from nichrome – an alloy of nickel, chromium and other metals – that fits within the dimensions of a cuboid container.

The wire form is placed inside the box, which is filled with a mixture of pure silica sand and leftover nylon powder collected as waste from selective laser sintering (SLS) – a form of 3D printing. The sand acts on one side as a filler material, by preventing the nylon powder from dripping off the wire, on the other side, it conducts and distributes the heat further away.

Sponsor SLS Nylon Powder - Digets2Widgets (London, UK)

Studio ilio is a London based design studio by Royal College of Art graduates Seongil Choi & Fabio Hendry focusing on material research and process development.

Studio ilio is passionate about seeking alternative environments in order to challenge and alter existing manufacturing processes and material uses. They believe that originality in function and aesthetic derives from a unique process. Their innovative products and hands-on experiments explore the boundaries between crafts and industry ranging from furniture to sculptural objects and installations.

Studio ilio







ⓒ copyrights 2003-2017 Designersparty, all rights reserved. all material published remains the exclusive copyright of Designersparty.