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Chang Ucchin (1917-1991) is a preeminent painter of the Korean modern period. He was influenced by European pre-war painters as well as Korean painting. The museum project was initiated by the collaboration of the Chang Ucchin Foundation and the city of Yangju, 10 kilometers north of Seoul. The site is on the edge of a small mountain, at the meeting point of two rivers.

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From the early days of the competition proposal, we focused on designing a specific space that would reflect the painting’s own character, rather than producing a generic, “perfect” exhibition building. Like the painter’s own art, we would avoid to propose neither a modern museum nor a Korean traditional image.

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Instead we started from a few selected paintings, describing abstract room images, landscape and animals (tiger, bird, tree and mountain), a house. Scattered rooms, in a traditional pattern, would then be weld together to form a body, floating in a painting like landscape, with a mountain background. The shape of the building itself present the ambiguity of simultaneously being an animal figure, an abstract sign, a traditional house and a labyrinth.

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The program is simply organized on three levels; a looped circuit first floor that offers sometimes open views or steep mountain slope views, framed by plain exhibition walls and high ceilings. The second level is a succession of separated attic rooms in a semi obscurity that would be fit for paper drawings and small formats. The basement contains services, seminar rooms and secured storage. The whole interior space gives the impression of a labyrinth house where you never get really lost. It offers shadows and contrasted views, avoiding the feeling of being in a perfectly lit conventional museum space.

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The façades are clad with polycarbonate extruded panels, which were chosen for their seamless weightlessness. White frame and plastic, in a style close to the local agricultural industry was the way chosen to avoid any monumentality or official reverence. The landscape is organized by the previously existing clearing, intervention is kept to a bare minimum; a few concrete walls and paths, the recycling of remaining walls, the preservation of the large chestnut trees that seem to thrive on this side of the mountain, the old picnic place maintained on the river shore.

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Architects : Chae-Pereira Architects Location : Gyeonggi-do, South Korea Area : 1650.0 sqm Project Year : 2014 Photographs : Park Wansoon, Thierry Sauvage Engineer : Jin Young Kim (J.Tec Structural Engineering Co.,Ltd), Sang Kwon Kim (BOW M.I.E Consultant), Suk Hwan Kwon (Ellim Consultant Co.,Ltd.), Chang Gyu Choe (MK Engineering & Consultant Co.,Ltd) Site Area : 6600m² Gross Floor Area : 1852m²

Chae Pereira Architects

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Pop up my chair: The stools and benches in Jongha Choi’s “De-dimension” collection are part of his Master’s project at the Design Academy Eindhoven. He’s sure to bag a lot of attention in the social media: The playful design and the surprise effect of folding and unfolding the furniture is bound to set the heart of any dedicated Instagrammer racing. Made of aluminum, steel and stainless steel, the seats can be folded up and hung like decorative prints on the wall to save space.

For the folding mechanism Choi was inspired by so-called “pop-up books”. His project started with the question how different the perception of an object is when in 2D rather than 3D and to what extent this perception can be undermined and changed. At present, the Korean designer is experimenting with additional materials and models for “De-dimension”. by Anna Moldenhauer

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The transformation to the seat is done with a handle. Made of aluminum, steel and stainless steel, the folded seats are robust and flexible.

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The history of the image has always aligned with the history of the human race. In our vast history, it has been understood and depicted in various forms. Nowadays, owing to scientific technology, it is developing in its form, from photography, film and even further towards virtual reality. Even the advent of 3D printing skills shake our fundamental notion of the image. Unlike the past, we are not only seeing the image as a means of reproducing objects, but also giving essential identity to the image itself.

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In other words, though the image still shows its visual effect on a flat plane, it is not just an expression of representation, but a making real an experience. In our current situation, in which modern society experiences the image, in relation to advertising, image circulation and the internet, why do we not question an images’ confinement to a flat surface.

Why don’t we try to get more stereoscopic and attempt for direct experience with the image. My question started with this point and I tried several experiments in order to realise this idea from a personal point of view.

Jongha Choi

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Shear House, a single family house in Korea, seeks how a simple treatment in pitched roof typology improves environmental qualities and influences to program organization. The volume of gable on the West end changes its placement along with body of house.

It projects out toward South at the East end, while maintaining its triangular shape. The sheared volume is continuously pulled out towards South responding to sun orientation. It creates a deep eave in South and a terrace in North.

The eave blocks direct sunlight in summer and allow natural lighting in winter. Openings at terrace in second level increase natural ventilation throughout the whole house. In addition double skin-facade controls heat and humidity thus the house reduces 20% of heat gain and loss in summer and winter.

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The house has two different ends, a typical gable end, and a sliced & shifted one in a monolithic structure and material. Shear House adds a new scene on the existing landscape. At the entrance of the town people face a typical gable wall. As they walk to the house entrance, they slowly recognize changes of eave and shadow and finally realize the sheared face at the entrance of the house.

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Two bedrooms, bathroom, library, stair and kitchen are placed in North half of the house. South half, a double height space, is a long and sculptured living room, which has generous multi-purpose space for client to invite many people in special occasions. The living room that goes through East end to West end, provides dynamic spatial qualities and light filtration in its depth and height with various visual connections.

Unlikely simple and static exterior, interior spaces provide playful experiences on changing geometries. Though rooms are rectangular in plan, laid out on grid, walls are triangle, parallelogram, and trapezoid in elevation due to its intersection with shifted roof volume.

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Location: Kyung Buk, Yecheon, Korea Program: Single Family Residential Dimension / Area: 22'x45'x20' / 990 sf Structural Engineering: Duhang Engineering Client: Private Completed Year: 2016 / Apr. Photograph: Song Yousub

stpmj is an idea-driven design practice based in New York and Seoul. The office is found by Seung Teak Lee and Mi Jung Lim with the belief that the work explores a new perspective built from careful observations of material, structure and program expanding to the social, cultural, environmental, and economic phenomena of our time.

stpmj navigates on uncharted territory of material experiments focused on its sensoriality and performativity expanding our conventional material culture to broader built environment. We seek provocative works that speculate on a broad range of investigations, leveraging the potential of materials in the stage of concept and production.

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