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white, sculptural buildings rest on a cliff of the southern coast in Geoje Island, South Korea. The white walls fold in themselves to create a private ocean view from each house. Tall pine trees that grow between the buildings and the sea form occasional view frames. This is the second resort for the hospitality group called “House of Mind.”

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The two-storey Knot House at the top is a clubhouse as well as the owner’s residence. At the border of the clubhouse, a V-shaped infinity pool merges with the ocean afar. Four other one-storey Knot Houses host six guest rooms. The narrow and long strip of the building site provided an initial challenge to fit maximum number of units while maintaining privacy and ocean view.

Atelier Chang suggested a layout to turn each house by 40 degrees toward the sea. This staggering allows an unrestricted ocean view for the guests and produces niches of private zones. Simulta¬neously, it amplifies the dynamic outline of the roofs where the visitor can read the continuity of the white angular masses forming mountainous peaks.

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The knot’s folding and unfolding creates different aperture in and outside the building. Where the knot unfolds in the front, 3 to 5 meter full height windows open toward the ocean view. In the rear, it tightens up and provides complete enclosure for privacy.

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Where the knot gets most loose, an intimate experience of bathing manages to escape out to the exterior garden. The boundary between the inside and outside seems blurred at this moment. It may feel ironic to be sitting in a Jacuzzi looking out to the ocean and garden on either side of the tub. The strategic manoeuvre of the knot aimed at providing such a unique experience while maintaining privacy. The knot continues as an interior intervention on a wooden strip. It demarcates a private zone for bed and tub sitting in the open living room.

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During the concept phase of the project, a key question was how to achieve seamless spatial connection between outdoor landscape and indoor living space through architecture. To answer that question, one had stop separating the building from the ground. Instead Atelier Chang imagined a surface made of landscape, which eventually folds into a knot to create an enclosure. The wild landscape floods into the terrace, generates patterns of herb garden, and gradually reaches the interior in continuous manner.

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The initial design was conceived for providing three typologies that mimic different knots. Like choosing a product from a catalogue, an interested client can choose and combine multiple typologies, then form a unique master plan to suit the site. Also the project brings multiple advantages from the real-estate point of view. At first, multiple units can be built for hospitality to generate immediate income. Years later, they can be converted and sold as residential units. The design itself took account of adaptability throughout the life span of the building from a guest unit to a fully functioning residence.

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Architects : Atelier Chang Location : Geoje-si, South Korea Design Team : Soohyun Chang, Federica Russo, Ryan Day, Hyunwoo Chung Area : 403.0 sqm Project Year : 2014 Photographs : Kyungsub Shin Contractor : HOM Structure Design : Thekujo Local Architect : K20Art Architects

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Atelier Chang is an international design praxis based in South Kensington, London and Zurich since 2011. Our design philosophy is to create innovative design through focusing on the unembellished basics – basics of nature, social behaviour, and urban phenomena.

To achieve this absolute simplicity of content through impactful forms takes extra effort in researching the context, a devotion to material and technology, and active interaction with other industries. Currently we work on projects in Asia and Europe at multiple scales of design, covering master plans, architecture, interior design, installations, and products.

Soohyun Chang founded Atelier Chang in 2011 to reinvent architectural design through new program, material, and construction method. Our design aims at larger impact for more people, which require more careful consideration of sustainability and strategy. The current London-based office works on project in different countries mainly focusing on resorts, restaurants, and residential development industry.

Atelier Chang

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Rhythm of the Red luster 1403, 2014, Ottchil, hemp cloth, 50 × 50 × 50 cm

Rhythm of the 5-Color Luster, the largest of his works, reveals the artist’s insight into light and the origin of color through repetitive reflection on a typical form that has intense color and rhythm created from dozens of layers of lacquer coating. The work represents traditional yet modern aesthetic value with a simple form, technical perfection, and vivid Obangsaek, the five directional colors (red, blue, yellow, white/green, and black) known as the traditional colors of Korean folk culture.

This piece represents the Korean affection or sentiment for sure. It is not only based on the original (very traditional) technique (skill and method), material (high quality sap, ramie, hemp) but also the spirit of the Korean folk culture (which related to the doctrine of the five natural elements of the positive and negative – Yin and Yang). These five elements symbolize earth, fire, water, tree, metal, which refer to topology, the worship of the nature and fortune telling.

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Rhythm of the Black luster 1501, 2015, Ottchil, hemp cloth, 35 × 35 × 35 cm

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Rhythm of the Black luster , 2015, Ottchil, hemp cloth, 25 × 50 × 50 cm

Chung practices the very traditional Ott-chil (Korean lacquer) technique. He has transformed this technique into a modern form to reveal the color and light of the Ott-chil. While most of the artisans who work with lacquer(ware) focus on the traditional style, he tries to create a unique form that is both traditional and contemporary.

In the Ott-chil technique, objects that are made or varnished with lacquer which is filtered, refined, and obtained with the sap from lacquer trees, native to Korea, China, Japan, and the Southeast Asian region. With its superb adhesiveness, water and heat resistance, durability, and function as a natural preservative, lacquer had been used on the surface of almost every material, such as metal, wood, porcelain, and even paper.

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The oldest lacquerware extant today is a small piece of varnish that dated back to the 3rd century BCE. However, artifacts in the complete form can be found from the 1st century BCE. These include black lacquer ancestral rites utensils, weapons, musical instruments, and jewellery. From the three kingdoms, the largest amount of lacquerware relics were for daily use (coloured lacquerware during the Silla period (57 BCE – 935 CE).

Out of the three kingdoms, unified Silla Kingdom (676-918) inherited a tradition called the pyungtal technique which emerged before the 7th century. Pyungtal was a popular technique in Tang China of crafting designs on gold and silver plates, after which new layers of lacquer were applied, dried and then ground away, so the surface could be polished to reveal the golden or silvery patterns beneath.

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This technique and design later evolved to Najeon chilgi or lacquerware with mother-of-pearl inlay that was made in the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392). During the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1897), use of decorations were discouraged due to Confucian influence, but lacquer was often used on wooden furniture and vessels because the clear lacquer finish showed the natural attributes of wood. Lacquer was used mainly as furniture varnish up until the early 20th century and it was not until the Korean War (1950-1953) that a renaissance arrived for lacquerware with art departments of universities researching and making lacquerware.

How a lacquer vessel was made - In this film Chung Hae-Cho takes us through the laborious and intuitive process of making a lacquer vessel.

CHUNG Hae-cho (b. 1945) studied wood lacquer craft at Hongik University. As a modern lacquer artisan, he conducted extensive research on lacquer craft at Kanazawa (Japan) and Ho chi mihn (Vietnam) and continuously strived to preserve, inherit, and develop traditional lacquer craft.

Also an emeritus professor at PaiChai University, he is known for creating formative works with lacquer coated on fabric frame, which is made by pasting many layers of hemp with rice glue. Chung uses a technique called Hyeop-jeo-tae which involves more than 50 layers (this time 100 layers more) of hemp with Ott-chil and after vanishing/polishing in each layer. Work make this way should last more than 1,000 years.

Chunghae Cho

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Donna FW17

“Quietness is the word that keeps resurfacing in my mind when I think of Forme d’Expression. There is quietness in its fabrics. They are luxurious, but never luxe. There is quietness of design; even when Park’s pieces are dramatic, and some of them definitely are, there is a certain restraint to them.”

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Donna FW17

The life work of couture trained Umbrian designer Koeun Park can be seen in the fragility and the poetic interplay between garment and wearer. Her belief is the two are symbiotic: the garment should never impose. In 2005 the house name Forme 3’3204322896 or Forme d’ Expression was created by decoding numeric orders of the “Helvetica-Fraction” font. Before sewing, each garment is hand cut, fused, marked, and prepped by Koeun.

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Uomo FW17

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Donna SS17

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Donna SS17

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Donna SS17

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Donna SS17

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Donna SS17

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Uomo SS17

Forme d'Expression designer Koeun Park was born in Seoul and studied Haute Couture workmanship at the Ecole de la Chambre Syndicale de la mode Parisienne, in Paris, before becoming a Master at Instituto Marangoni in Milan in 1998. She began the label in Italy in 2005.

The meticulous approach to construction, followed by many layers of post work exemplify the brand's philosophy of having the clothing be real, and familiar even before the wearer slips the garment on. Quietly elegant and real, the label aims to create different forms of human expression through fashion.

Forme D’Expression







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