Fluttering flower series / NB0152
Oxidized silver, white pearls, 24k yellow gold leaf
2 1/2" wide x 2 1/2" high on 16" to 18 1/2" multi cable wire



Oriental hill series / N0157
Oxidized silver, white pearls, 24k yellow gold leaf
16" to 18 1/2" length.



The chrysanthemum is bathed in moonlight
Oxidized silver, 18k yellow gold, tourmaline
2" wide x 2" high

Glowing I
10x10x2 inches.
sterling, fine silver and copper wires


So Young Park's contemporary jewelry forms and theory are inspired from her thesis, Nativity and memories from her childhood. She grew up near the ocean in southern part South Korea. So Young used to play with sea life and plants and collected many different kinds of shells and pebbles. She loved touching and observing the surface texture and pattern of shells and various naturally shaped pebbles during her happy childhood.

As So Young grew, she had several tragic experiences involving the death of her friends. She suffered a long time and her view of life and death dramatically grew different from many other people. Through her thesis works, she found that human life and plant life have similar growth and life characteristics. From an atheistic point view, nature reveals the beauty of the eternal cycles of life, like how rebirth transcends the tragedy of death. In order to bear fruit, plants must progress through many stages of life. During this process different parts of the plants body are required to be sacrificed for the fruit. However, this sacrifice does not signify the end of life, but gives birth to new life. In doing so, this process creates the eternal cycle of life. Her thesis pieces express desire, hope, and the power of life through organic plant forms, that are artistically rendered in a simplistic, geometric, and sophisticated manner.

Her jewelry art forms are assembled through the harmonic use of wires, tiny discs, engraved patterns, and textures forged of gold or silver, creating elegant, yet unusual visual forms. The use of wires, small discs, textures, and other small elements represent the single cells that makeup all life. Each piece contributes to long and painful process to create a beautiful and unusual art forms.

So Young Park

Orange Seed Segmentation, 2009; acid etched glass



Purple & Green Embryo Segmentation hot sculptured, cut, assembled glass 5.5" x 11.5" x 8"



Purple & Yellow Segmentation hot sculptured, cut, assembled glass 8" x 12" x 6.5"



Orange & Magenta Embryo Segmentation hot sculptued, cut, assembled glass 6.5" x 12.5" x 7"

Jiyong Lee’s Segmentation Series is inspired by his fascination with cell division. He works with glass that has simultaneous transparency and opacity; two qualities that metaphorically represent the clarity and mysteries of biology.




Homage to DNA, 2008; acid etched glass; 14½

Jiyong Lee is an assistant professor at Southern Illinois University Carbondale where he teaches as Head of the Glass Program. Lee was born and raised in Korea.

The deceptive simplicity and understated intricacy of Lee’s compositions represent the contradictory relationship between clarity and complexity found within life. Similar to the way “cells start to segment and become a life,” the uniquely refined transclucent laminated glass surface suggests the mysterious qualities of cells, and on a larger scale, the ambigiuity of our temporal existence. As the viewer moves around Lee’s objects the play of light transforms the sculpture into startling new forms which play on our perceptions and our expectations.

Ji Yong Lee



#6 02 white oak 2010 16 x 12 x 8



#7 01 ash, copper wire 2010 30 x 23 x 20



# 08 02 ash, copper wire 2010 40 x 30 x 36

My work operates out of the conceptual space where my ideas about human relationship encounter the structural processes of hand made forms. My particular interest in human relationship has been human coexistence in modern global society. I explore issues of intense emotional tension, obsession, violence and sexuality through the material process of bending thin wood strips and stitching them with metal wires. These construction methods express the understanding that every human being is connected, bounded and destined to exist together. 

As such, the form of the human body itself deeply influences my work both formally and conceptually.  I see my objects as containers. The word, ‘to contain’, has an important role in my body of work. As a container, the object makes a boundary of inside and outside, creating a new space and volume. Ultimately, it synthesizes all the elements of the object making possibilities to become more than what it is.  It is in this synthesis of elements that the objects speak to our experience as humans. When we surrender our view of distinction and containment, we allow ourselves the possibility to become something much greater.

Hee Chan Kim






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