Zoonomia, 2012  Work-In-Progress

In my most recent video, “Zoonomia”, I investigate the complex and seemingly capricious aspects of evolution. Desmond Morris, in his book “The Naked Ape”, referred to human history as the remarkable success story of a modestly designed mammal”. What if conditions had been different and had favored the development of other species instead of mankind? What if animals and insects were equal to “our arrogant dominant species” and extinct creatures returned?





Zoonomia, 2012  Work-In-Progress, Still

The camera begins with the blink of an eye, establishing the viewer as the protagonist, and moves through a garden/forest where every leaf and twig is made by hand. Embedded within the foliage are many creatures and hybrid - humans plus moving video images which act as portals to different worlds.

YeonJin Kim



The Newly Coming Seasons, 2009 DigiBeta, color, 0:11:40, 2D Computer

Demilitarized Zone was created as an armistice agreement on July 27th, 1953.
Since that day, we have known that DMZ is the places of intact ecosystem far away from mankind.  However, with a gunfight and arson by militants and a disturbance of the nature by foreign plants as well, on its bare ground, there are a lot of problems on man and nature not being solved by North and South.



Director/character design/editing : MIN Sung-ah
Production : Gyeonggi Digital Contents Agency
Producer : JEON Byung-jin
Key animation : MIN Sung-ah/KIM Seung-wha
Animation : LEE Hyun-ji/MIN Yu-mi/AHN Soo-jeong/KIM Seung-wha/CHOI Eun-ha/PARK Hyun-kyung
Coloring : MIN Yu-mi/CHOI Eun-ha/LEE Yeon-hee/KIM Han-na/LEE Sae-ah/HONG Bora/HWANG Su-young/LEE Jung-ik/FENG Jun
3D effect : WON Jong-shik
Sound supervisor : LEE Young-bin
Mixing : KIM Tae-ha
Sound effect : YANG Kwang-sup/KIM Yun-kyung
Foley : MOON Jae-hong/KIM Yong-kook
Composer : KIM Tae-seong
Performance : KIM Tae-seong/KIM Ji-young/LEE Hwa-youn/KIM Se-jin/
LEE Ho-won/The Strings

The Newly Coming Seasons

agency : David&Goliath
VFX and director : Mark Romanek

Those hip hamsters of soul are back in a new ad campaign featuring "Party Rock Anthem," by the electro-pop group LMFAO.
The Kia hamsters have rolled through suburban neighborhoods and urban streets and are now in a dark, video game-inspired world to "Share Some Soul," in a new ad campaign.

The new campaign will feature 30- and 60-second TV spots as well as in-cinema, digital, and social media elements, Kia said in a statement.


The 60-second spot, available now on YouTube (check it out after the jump), will make its television debut on August 28 during the 2011 MTV Video Music Awards (VMAs). It will also appear in movie theaters starting September 2. A 30-second version will appear on network and cable television beginning September 5, and the campaign will also have a presence on Facebook, Kia.com, and YouTube. A LMFAO-inspired shuffle dance video submission contest hosted on the Kia Soul YouTube channel and Facebook page will also be announced.

"After just two model years, the Soul receives significant technology improvements for the 2012 model year and delivers class-leading power and fuel efficiency. Our new multifaceted campaign will continue to raise consumer awareness, perception and consideration for the Kia brand through online engagement, experiential activations and TV," Michael Sprague, vice president, marketing and communications, Kia Motors America, said in a statement.

Method Studios

Vaudeville 2005 (South Korea/U.S., 5 minutes, color) Director: Chansoo Kim

Chansoo Kim pays tribute to his grandparents in his interpretive animated film, Vaudeville. In this highly personal history of 1930s Korea, Kim uses a surreal setting and metaphorical incidents to illustrate a time when sentimental pop songs and crude comedy shows masked the adversity and impassable walls Koreans faced while under Japanese occupation. He worked long hours on the 2D animation, which took a year and a half to complete.



Chansoo Kim is an animator based in Los Angeles. He had worked as a graphic designer in Seoul, Korea for five years when he decided to pursue his passion from childhoood.

Kim studied animation in the University of Southern California, and produced short animated films using various techniques. His films, Woman in the Attic and Floating gained critical attention through the festival circuit. His new film, Vaudeville is currently touring the festivals.

Chansoo Kim

North Korean animation “Pencil Rocket” has been posted on the Internet video site YouTube. This animation, which was made for elementary school children, teaches the children how to use a protractor. However, the contents are comprised of hostility towards the US military and efforts to defeat them.

The story is as follows: The main character, Seok-Pal, is trying to catch a rabbit in the forest when a friend mocks him by saying, “All you do is draw those pig-headed American bastards in class and now here you are playing war all by yourself.” He then returns home and sits at his desk. The homework he has to do is on how to use a protractor. Seok-Pal is inciting his will to fight by drawing an American military helmet with the letters U.S. written on it in his textbook when he suddenly falls asleep.

In his dream the U.S. fleet is coming to attack. He and his friend try to defeat the U.S. soldiers by firing a rocket they have made from pencils, but they continue to fail because they can’t correctly set the angle. This is because they didn’t know how to use the protractor. Finally Seok-Pal awakes after suffering the counter-attacks of the American fleet. Seok-Pal states that he “realizes that he needs to study hard in class and listen to his teachers to become a good soldier of the people.” This leads into some math practice on accurately setting the center axis when measuring angles on the protractor.

The Eternal Smile, by Gene Luen Yang & Derek Kirk Kim.
New York: First Second, 2009. * pp. ISBN



Aspect to Aspect Transtion in The Eternal Smile (p. 35)
Medium: Watercolor, A splash page

Derek Kirk Kim (b. 1974 in Gumi, South Korea) is an award-winning Korean-American cartoonist. He won both major industry awards in 2004, the Eisner and the Harvey, for his debut graphic novel Same Difference and Other Stories, which was originally serialized on his website Lowbright (formerly known as "Small Stories"). He also won the Ignatz Award for promising new talent, in 2003, for the same graphic novel (which was originally published with the help of a 2002 Xeric Award).

Kim came to the United States when he was eight. He considers himself fortunate to have received formal training in the visual arts and in the craft of writing. Much of his early highly acclaimed work was done while living with his parents in Pacifica, California. He now lives in Portland, Oregon.

All of his stories reflect, to a greater or lesser degree, his personal experiences. He offers poignant tales with an ever-present dash of humor. His drawing style is realistic and clean, based on the "clear line" school made famous by Tintin creator Hergé. His story lines range from the naturalistic to the fantastic.

Most of the hostility and criticism of Kim's work seems to be self-directed (either explicitly or by skewering protagonists who resemble their creator), perhaps reflecting the influence of Robert Crumb.

Derek kirk Kim



Priest was a manhwa (Korean comic) series created by Hyung Min-woo. It fuses the Western genre with supernatural horror and dark fantasy themes and is notable for its unusual, angular art style. An interview with Hyung in Priest: Volume 3 states that the comic was inspired by the computer game Blood, which featured a similar horror-Western aesthetic and undead protagonist.




Priest was published in English by Tokyopop. The manhwa was adapted into the 2011 American horror film of the same name.



Director: Scott Charles Stewart
Writers: Cory Goodman, Min-Woo Hyung
Stars: Paul Bettany, Cam Gigandet and Maggie Q

Born in 1973, Hyung published his first manwha, Chronicle of a Hot-blooded Judo King, in 1994 and four years later the first volume of Priest caught the attention of readers around the world. Priest was made into a video game (not available in the US) and there's been rumors of a movie, but to date no official announcement has been made regarding the status of the project.






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