Cutlery design focuses on getting food in bite-sized morsels from the plate to the mouth, but it could do so much more. The project aims to reveal just how much more, stretching the limits of what tableware can do. Focusing on ways of making eating a much richer experience, a series of dozens of different designs has been created, inspired by the phenomenon of synesthesia. This is a neurological condition where stimulus to one sense can affect one or more of the other senses.

An everyday event, ‘taste’ is created as a combination of more than five senses. Tasty formulas with the 5 elements – temperature, color, texture, volume/weight, and form – are applied to design proposal. Via exploring ‘synesthesia’ if we can stretch the borders of what tableware can do, the eating experience can be enriched in multi-cross-wiring ways.



The tableware we use for eating should not just be a tool for placing food in our mouth, but it should become extensions of our body, challenging our senses even in the moment when the food is still on its way to being consumed. Each of designs have been created to stimulate or train different senses – allowing more than just our taste buds to be engaged in the act and enjoyment of eating as sensorial stimuli, therefore it would lead the way of mindful eating which guides to rediscovering a healthy and joyful relationship with food.

The materials in the design currently compose of metal, plastic and ceramics. Each material possesses its natural temperature, which works in harmony with the intent of the design.  From the thickness of the handle to the volume mass of the spoon, it evokes a different effect. Weight distribution changes according to the thickness and the volume affects the sound vibration. Each of these features is subtle but in combination, they harmonize into enhanced tasty effects. As for the specific workings of the features of the design, it could be understood through the elaboration of the five elements – temperature, color, texture, volume/weight and form.

Jinhyun Jeon



I have recently started a side project of conceptual pieces, ranging from sculptures to installations. Here is the first of the series called Frames. The piece is composed of a simple white frame and is attached to glass windows of Art Center College of Design without any visible fixtures. Putting a frame on an existing windows has a number of interesting phenomenas.



First of all, it passively lures viewers to look where they normally wouldn't have. Secondly, the frame creates a visual trick in exaggerating depth. I've heard people say, "Wow, it looks three dimensional." Obviously, everything you see is. It also helps start a discussion on the definition of "art". As a designer I have always found the fine lines that surround art interesting. Is framing a beautiful, random, and natural composition of branches art? Numerous people have come to me and said "yes" to to that question. I'm still exploring. - Andrew Kim

Andrew Kim

Nuue, originally called Wrapped Garment project, is named after a Korean word means cocoon. 2011



Wrapping synthetic fibre around a desired form such as a wooden mannequin or a board. Through a heating process with pressure, wound fibre transforms itself into a 3-dimensional moulded garment bringing expected and unexpected sculptural silhouettes with flexible texture. The garment can be completed with only unitary fibre and heat. This technique reduces processes of making fabric from fibre, also from fabric to garment such as making/cutting pattern, and sawing. Therefore there is no leftover or wastage of material in this process.



Jungeun has been experimenting and researching unconventional methods of creating garments. Rethinking about the fundamental process of producing a garment has led her to the Nuue project. The conceptual garments and products that have been created through the discovered technique display the potential of this idea and a journey that she will continue to develop

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Nuue, originally called Wrapped Garment project, is named after a Korean word means cocoon. 2011

This technique reduces processes of making fabric from fibre, also from fabric to garment such as making/cutting pattern, and sewing. Therefore there is no leftover or wastage of material in this process. Jungeun has been experimenting and researching unconventional methods of creating garments. Rethinking the fundamental process of producing a garment  led her to the idea of the Nuue project.



Shota Aoyagi and Jungeun Lee both of Japanese descent, studied together in London and created Studio Koya. Their latest exhibition called “Nuue”, and originally called Wrapped Garment project, is named after a Korean word which means cocoon.It started by wrapping synthetic fiber around  desired form such as a wooden mannequin or a board. Through a heating process with pressure, wound fiber transforms itself into a 3-dimensional moulded garment bringing expected and unexpected sculptural silhouettes with flexible texture. The garment can be complete with only fibre and heat.

Studio koya



Symbiosis of Potato+Apple

Apples emit a lot of ethylene gas. It has the effect of speeding up the ripening process of fruits and vegetables kept together with apples. When combined with potatoes, apples prevent them from sprouting.



Verticality of Root Vegetables

Keeping roots in a vertical position allows the organism to save energy and remain fresh for a longer time. This shelf gives a place for them to stand easily, using sand. At the same time, sand helps to keep the proper humidity.



Humidity of Fruit Vegetables
We tend to think zucchini, aubergine, cucumber, etc. as vegetables.But they are biologically fruits. This shelf gives them a space to be outside the fridge. Also through the ritual to water them everyday, they will stay fresh.



Dryness of Spices

Rice absorbs humidity easily. The spice container with rice inside helps spices stay dry without forming into lumps.



Breathing of Eggs

An egg has millions of holes in its shell. It absorbs the odour and substance around itself very easily. This creates a bad taste if it’s kept in the fridge with other food ingredients. This shelf provides a place for eggs outside of the fridge. Also the freshness of eggs can be tested in the water. The fresher they are, the further they sink.

This project is about traditional oral knowledge which has been accumulated from experience and transmitted by mouth to mouth. Particularly focusing on the food preservation, it looks at a feasible way of bringing that knowledge into everyday life. Through the research into the current situation of food preservation, I’ve learned that we hand over the responsibility of taking care of food to the technology, the refrigerator. We don’t observe the food any more and we don’t understand how to treat it.

Therefore my design looks at re-introducing and re-evaluating traditional oral knowledge of food, which is closer to nature. Furthermore, it aims to bring back the connection between different levels of living beings, we as human beings and food ingredients as other living beings. Through the objects of everyday life, design can introduce traditional oral knowledge into people’s lives through their experience of using it. Objects make invisible knowledge evident.

Save food from the fridge

Beef Finland 2012 explores the problems of excessive beef production and consumption in both global and Finnish scales and strives to better understand the problem through design. Systems thinking and behavioural economics put together, the project offers 11 different ideas as food for thoughts to different gatekeepers and decision makers in the food system in Finland.



Beef Finland 2012

Seung ho Lee

Microfactory   is a project centered around designing domestic manufacturing machinery. The project allows people to make their own products at home easily as well as share their own designs. By focusing on concepts of open-source design and the principles of reusing materials around the home, Micro Factory looks to use design to develop new manufacturing methods, which benefit society as a whole.



Inspiration

We use lots of product over our whole lifetime. Sometimes a product lasts long and sometimes it doesn’t. In other words, products around us always change. They are disposed for different reasons such as the product damage, dying, or just becoming useless. It is a problem that they easily die or break and then become waste. However in recent times, it is even more of a problem when the owner becomes easily bored with the product, rendering it useless and turning it to waste.

Obviously however not all objects are functionally essential, we can easily get bored with a product or buy the same product repeatedly. Why can’t the objects we use have the same value as our treasured items? Old pictures in a frame, my grandfather’s broken watch on my wardrobe. If I make a product by myself, can it be better? Maybe. By engaging in its manufacture I can understand the issues the product faces when it is broken and my wife would also like it, because I made it.

Dae Kyung Ahn

Bringing Craftsmanship Into a Computerized Technology.

HAPTIC INTELLIGENTSIA is a human 3D printing machine that allows the user to tactually perceive the virtual object and to directly transform it into the physical. The user can freely move the extruding gun, which is attached to a haptic interface.



When the tip of the gun is moved into a surface region of the virtual object, the interface generates forces under computer control, allowing the user to feel and touch the surface of the object.Without looking at the computer screen, the only way to visualize the virtual object is to pull the trigger and extrude the material along the feedback surface.



The results are always unique and different, depending on how each user responds to the machine’s guidance. The sense of touch is no longer present in our current screen-based interface. HAPTIC INTELLIGENTSIA humanizes the 3D printing process, bringing the user a tactile relationship to the virtual object.

Joong Han Lee







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