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Lit Motors C1 Self Balancing Electric Motorbike

LIT Motors C1 has two wheels, but it also has doors and a steering wheel. it uses gyroscopes and electric motors to keep its balance. LIT Motors claims the C1 can do many bike-like things - including split lanes and park at a right angle to the street between cars - but its enclosed cabin should impart a feel that is more car than motorcycle.

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C1 can run up to 200 miles on a single charge

C1 can speed to 120mph

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Early in 2010, the company revealed a non-functioning show model of the C-1. The design vision showcased an enclosed two-wheeled vehicle self-balanced by two single-gimbal control moment gyroscopes, to be powered by lithium iron phosphate batteries. Design specifications indicated that it could hold a second passenger, though no model or pictures other than computer renderings showed more than single-passenger capacity. Computer renderings of a two passenger model indicate that the tight space would likely not be suitable for long trips, as the area behind the driver's seat is very limited, in a semi-reclined position, with legs straddling the front seat.

Similar to a motorcycle, the original C-1 design has two wheels, but uses a small steering wheel instead of handlebars. Direct-drive in-hub motors in both wheels were designed to provide a high amount of torque, stability and traction control, while allowing for the body form to be about half the size of a car. The alpha prototype shows both wheels without direct drive and only a single person capacity, indicating that the design may be undergoing changes.

Safety features were intended to include a steel unibody chassis, seat belts, airbags, and a gyroscope stability system.

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Kubo Scooter, with its 45 mph top speed and 50 mile operating range.

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Lit Motors C1 EV demonstrates


Lit Motors Inc. is a San Francisco-based company that designs two-wheeled vehicles, including a fully electric, gyroscopically stabilized vehicle.

Founded by Daniel K. Kim in 2010, Lit Motors designs two-wheeled vehicles with a focus on innovative and disruptive technologies. To date, they have released information about two projects, the AEV (auto-balancing electric vehicle) often referred to as the "C-1" and the Kubo cargo scooter. The inspiration for Lit Motors came to Kim in 2003, when he was nearly crushed by a chassis while manually assembling a bio-diesel Land Rover Defender 90. Kim's decided to "chop a car in half" to create what is now the C-1.

Lit Motors

Gregory Guillaume, Chief Designer at Kia's European styling base in Frankfurt, says "[It's] an emotional and muscular car aimed at delivering pure fun and performance for today's city-based enthusiast driver. The potent shaping displays a balanced and refined outline within a compact overall shape and the tiny front and rear overhangs enhance the balance within its proportions."


Kia has taken a stab at the sport hatchback segment with its Provo Concept. Unveiled at the 2013 Geneva Motor Show, the machine features menacing styling that could give the Mini Cooper or Citroën DS3 something to sweat over.



Kia says the concept features a hybrid drivetrain comprised of a turbocharged 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine with 201 horsepower that spins the front wheels, while a 44 hp electric motor can add extra thrust to the back rollers when necessary for simulated all-wheel drive. The setup can also provide electric-only propulsion at low speeds.

The B-segment designation is a European class of cars that are "bigger than a city car but smaller than a small family car." Kia is after this growing market as Europeans choose to downsize in favor of smaller cars with funkier design attributes.

The hybrid-drive Niro Concept is powered by a revised Kia 1.6 liter T-GDi engine that delivers 158 hp to the front wheels via a 7-speed dual clutch gearbox. This is backed by an electric motor capable of delivering 33.5 kW (45 hp) to the rear wheels when conditions require.

Designed at Kia’s Design Studio in Frankfurt, the Niro is suitably compact for the urban lifestyle, measuring 4.2 meters (13.8 ft) long, 1.8 meters (5.9 ft) and 1.6 meters (5.25 ft) tall – just slightly smaller than the 5-door Soul.



One design characteristic sure to draw attention is the Niro’s dihedral doors. Normally found on the likes of Lamborghini and other exotics, these butterfly doors swing up and forward over the roof, giving plenty of space for access to the concept cabin. Milled Plexiglas mirrors are inset into the side windows and sport built-in cameras.

Inside the Niro, one piece clam shell seats lined with “Orbit Silver” material feature alongside anodized aluminum and leather trim. Twin posts jutting out of the center console house the start-stop button, transmission switch and an adjustable ring for volume control.

The digital instrument panel can be formatted to the driver’s liking with the option to display additional information on the center console-mounted screen.

A split rear bench in the back allows for 2+2 seating and can fold down to increase storage in the carbon fiber cargo deck. The Niro also has a nifty little trick when loading groceries – the rear hatch features two-part lighting that when opened raises only part of the light cluster in order to improve cargo visibility in the dark. The secondary cluster of lights remains in place to improve safety and visibility against oncoming traffic. This light concept could actually prove to be useful given Europe’s many narrow, dimly lit inner city streets.

Lee Jung-woo (Chung Lee), who designed the exterior of the Venza. The Toyota Venza is a mid-size crossover SUV (CUV) produced by Japanese automaker Toyota and unveiled at the 2008 North American International Auto Show in Detroit. Based on the Toyota FT-SX concept car unveiled at the 2005 North American International Auto Show, the Venza was primarily engineered at Toyota Technical Center in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and designed at the Calty Design studios in Newport Beach, California.



It is currently slotted in size and price between the RAV4 compact crossover SUV, and the Highlander mid-size crossover SUV that has third-row seating. However, the Venza is an inch longer than the Highlander and for the 2009-2010 model years, the base Venza's MSRP was $1000 USD higher than the base Highlander.

The Venza is built at Toyota Motor Manufacturing Kentucky (TMMK) in Georgetown, Kentucky, production having commenced on November 10, 2008



DACC-2 (Daewoo Advanced Concept Car-2)

Static model with an electric propulsion styled, developed and built by I.DE.A Institute - Seoul Motor Show 1995

Hyundai's E4U (the four E's are Egg, Evolution, Electricity and Eco-friendliness) has a rotating front "sphere" allowing the 180-pound vehicle to go in any direction. Meanwhile, the vehicle, which includes a helmet that apparently doubles as the top of the "egg," has 500-watt motor that delivers a top speed of about 18 miles per hour. It's sort of like a Segway with a shell.



Efficient personal transport vehicles aren’t exactly a pristine example of new technology — they’ve been around for a while. Motorized scooters, mopeds, and the immortal Segway have all tried their hand at improving the way humans make their daily travels. None have caught on in any major way, though.

New York City is filled with people irritatedly waiting for subways, irritatedly attempting to catch cabs, or irritatedly rushing toward their destination on foot. Everyone’s late everywhere, and it’s not really their fault — they just don’t have a reliable way to get around. At the Seoul Motor Show this year, Hyundai debuted a concept for its personal mobility vehicle (PMV), the E4U. Though it’s shaped like an egg with training wheels sticking out of the back — certainly difficult to chain to a bike rack — the E4U is aimed to be an efficient vehicle for personal transport.

The eggmobile can maneuver in any direction even though its motor only moves in one. What makes this possible is, rather than a traditional tire, the E4U uses a semisphere that can rotate in all directions; it’s riding around on a ball. When the top of the semisphere is touching and vertically aligned to the ground, the vehicle moves by rotating the semisphere horizontally.

Since the vehicle sits atop and is able to move due to what is a multidirectional ball, the two training wheels prevent the E4U from spinning uncontrollably. In order to move the vehicle in any direction without hindrance from the training wheels, the E4U simply tilts in a direction, lifting the wheels up off the floor. If that sounds complex, it works similarly to the way a helicopter works. Imagine the semisphere as the blades, and the training wheels as the tail rotor.

The HND-9 is the ninth concept model developed by the Hyundai’s design center in Namyang, Korea. The vehicle, with its dramatic, long hood and wheelbase, has an overall length of 15.4 feet, width of 6.2 feet and height of 4.4 feet. The wheelbase measures in at 9.4 feet.

Combining classic rear-drive coupe proportions with a modern and somewhat unique look, the lines of the HND-9 underscore the high performance image of the vehicle. Sophisticated details and premium materials, meanwhile, solidify the upmarket look Hyundai is rapidly adopting.

Key details include fluid surfaces, character lines stretching the length of the vehicle, voluminous proportions and a wide, hexagonal-shaped radiator grille. Moreover, butterfly doors, sculptural rear combination lamps, and dual tailpipes placed on both sides, give the car a sleek, futuristic look. The wheels are 22-inch light alloys that feature carbon elements to help reduce unsprung weight.







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