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Anthropometry - Walking woman, 156 x 54 x 124 cm. polyurethane, wood. 2017

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Anthropometry. 144 x 70 x 51 cm. polyurethane, wood. 2017

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Anthropometry. 164 x 57 x 61 cm.polyurethane ,wood,plaster. 2017

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ByungHo Lee instills breath and movement into his sculptural work using a soft material, silicone, and an air compressor to compress or inject air quickly. Lee embodies physical/external or mental/internal changes and alterations that he explores constantly using silicone, air and time. However, the external change is not limited to only appearance but also embraces stories about the inner side, mind, society and the times that made this alteration.

His breathing and moving sculpture represents transformation from a child’s face to a skull, from young people’s faces to the elderly faces with deep wrinkles and from the firm skin to the lifeless form exposing the skeleton underneath, which is his own representation of the timeless theme of art – life and death.

ByungHo Lee was born in Seoul in 1976. He obtained both B.A.(2004) and M.A.(2010) degrees in sculpture at Hongik University.

ByungHo Lee

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Hong san, 2016, Encre de Chine et acrylique, 13 4/5 × 16 1/10 in; 35 × 41 cm

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Pour mieux dormir, 2016, Encre de Chine et crayon de couleur, 6 3/10 × 9 2/5 in; 16 × 24 cm

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La fin de la journée, 2014, Indian ink, watercolour, acrylic and colour pencil on paper, 7 9/10 × 7 9/10 in; 20 × 20 cm

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Île 1, 2015, Indian ink, watercolour and acrylic on paper, 16 3/10 × 19 7/10 in; 41.5 × 50 cm

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Migrateur, 2015, Indian ink and acrylic on paper, 10 × 12 1/5 in; 25.5 × 31 cm

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Jung Yeon Min’s works are highly imaginative and rich. One finds multiple worlds, the extraordinary and the realistic, notions of micro and macro, and manipulations of space and time in her work. Specifically, her work offers two equal but divergent investigations. On the one hand, she envisions and explores a mysterious and fantastical world. In a separate but concurrent investigation, she examines the effect of time in the pictorial realm. Sometimes colliding, these two points of inquiry form an intriguing basis for a closer reading of Min’s works as opening up places of potential and possibility.

In the realm between the real and the virtual her paintings present imaginary worlds asking us to search for their specific force, their capacity for rupturing and transforming life. Tracing this force within her works offers an understanding of what her artwork achieves and her vision of our potential. Understanding her virtual world involves questioning the very possibilities of life. Min does not want us to see her worlds simply as familiar experiences; while she uses perspective as a technique to produce a sense of comfort and familiarity, she jolts us with a sense of the strange at the same time.

Her paintings show Min’s integration of the familiar world with that of the strange. While she uses perspective to demarcate the division between the world that we know and the virtual world, she emphasizes seeing strangeness in an environment that is known and safe. By displaying various perspectives of time and temporality in many of her works, she seems to interrogate the concept of time and its effects. We are left questioning, what in the painting is waiting for a transformation to occur?

Min never settles this question for us, leaving us unsettled about what exactly we are supposed to seeing, what we are supposed to be waiting for. Thus, she disturbs our conventional understanding of time as a progression, from one event or occurrence to another, to a more multi-layered perspective. The presence of realism allows the fantastical world to make sense, so what would otherwise seem strange becomes familiar and inviting. She disarms resistance to this otherness, change and difference. Her worlds offer a way of being that breaks out of boundaries, both geographical and temporal, and that challenges us to envision a life beyond convention.

Jung Yeon Min

— Voice and Dance Performance, 15min Public spaces at Palais Garnier, Paris, France Project by Ayoung Kim & Sébastien Bertaud Music Composition: Hyun-Hwa Cho

The project was realized under Pavillon Neuflize OBC program, research lab of the Palais de Tokyo 2015/2016 during its collaboration with the Opéra national de Paris, the Institut national de l’audiovisuel and the Groupe de recherches musicales (INA– GRM).

The bitumen appears both in ancient myths of great floods common to humankind and in the construction of Palais Garnier, an Opera house in Paris. When Palais Garnier was under construction, a branch of the Seine flooded. The architect Charles Garnier built an underground reservoir plastered with bitumen in order to stop the flooding that would not stop even after months of efforts to empty it. This space has protected Palais Garnier as the ballast water puts weight on the hull to stabilize the unloaded ship.

The artist has constructed In This Vessel We Shall Be Kept from appropriating common elements across time and space, which include the vessel (or the arc) waterproofed with bitumen to save the humanity from rain falling night and day for many days, the great flood mythologies and catastrophes.

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In This Vessel We Shall Be Kept_Performance (2016) — Voice and Dance Performance, 15min

The project takes root in the basement of the Palais Garnier – specifically in the depths of its famous underground “lake” – to stage a long forgotten mythical flood. This artificial reservoir, which dates back to the construction of the edifice, is coated with pitch – a petroleum derivative with waterproofing properties – with which Noah supposedly caulked the hull of his ark. The Opera Garnier will become the flamboyant manifestation of a forgotten flood. (Chloé Fricout)

The bitumen appears both in ancient myths of great floods common to humankind and in the construction of Palais Garnier, an Opera house in Paris. When Palais Garnier was under construction, a branch of the Seine flooded. The architect Charles Garnier built an underground reservoir plastered with bitumen in order to stop the flooding that would not stop even after months of efforts to empty it.

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This claustrophobic space has protected Palais Garnier as the ballast water puts weight on the hull to stabilize the unloaded ship. On top of this historical fact of Palais Garnier, the structural similarities of place inside of the opera house called ‘nef (nave)’ in French which is structurally shaped like a boat and designates the central corridor of the temple/cathedral.

The artist has constructed In This Vessel We Shall Be Kept from appropriating common elements across time and space, which include the vessel (or the arc) waterproofed with bitumen to save the humanity from rain falling night and day for many days, the great flood mythologies and catastrophes: the archetype and mythical elements of the great flood make common appearances from the Bible, Quran and the Epic of Gilgamesh of the ancient Mesopotamia which is now a troubled region. Also the structure of Palais Garnier and contemporary disaster narratives are diffused in the project.

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The project was realized under Pavillon Neuflize OBC program, research lab of the Palais de Tokyo 2015/2016 during its collaboration with the Opéra national de Paris, the Institut national de l’audiovisuel and the Groupe de recherches musicales (INA– GRM).

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Ayoung Kim (Currently lives and works in Paris and Seoul.)

Interested in the relationship between image, language, voice/sound and the formal properties of these elements, Ayoung Kim’s porous narrative structures seek possible integrations, articulations and collisions of things in between time, space, structure and syntax. In doing so, Ayoung Kim plays with the notions of crossings, transmissions, translations, transpositions and reversibility by focusing on unlikely encounters of ideas. Open to multidisciplinary and criss-crossing collective working processes, she adopts the devices of storytelling, narrativity and rhetoric to evoke alternative forms of reading, listening and thinking of our present human condition. Her work stands as experimentation focused on various types of writing and the narrative structure, on visual, sonic and linguistic levels.

Ayoung Kim had solo shows at Melbourne Festival (2017); Palais de Tokyo (2016) and created a performance at the national opera house in Paris, Palais Garnier (2016). She presented her works at the 56th Venice Biennale, Italy (2015); Maraya Art Centre, Dubai, UAE (2015); Künstlerhaus Bethanien, Berlin, Germany (2012); Leeum Samsung Museum of Art, Seoul, Korea (2012); Museum of Arts and Design (MAD), New York, US (2011); Museum of Modern Art of Rio de Janeiro(MAM), Brazil (2011); 176/Zabludowicz Collection, London, UK (2011); Royal Academy of Arts, London, UK (2010) and many others. She was a resident artist at Pavillon Neuflize OBC Research Lab of Palais de Tokyo (2015-2016), and Künstlerhaus Bethanien, Berlin (2012). She was awarded The British Institution Award from Royal Academy of Arts in the UK in 2010 and Young Artist of the Year Award from the Ministry of Culture in Korea, 2015.

Ayoung Kim







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