Cutlery design focuses on getting food in bite-sized morsels from the plate to the mouth, but it could do so much more. The project aims to reveal just how much more, stretching the limits of what tableware can do. Focusing on ways of making eating a much richer experience, a series of dozens of different designs has been created, inspired by the phenomenon of synesthesia. This is a neurological condition where stimulus to one sense can affect one or more of the other senses.

An everyday event, ‘taste’ is created as a combination of more than five senses. Tasty formulas with the 5 elements – temperature, color, texture, volume/weight, and form – are applied to design proposal. Via exploring ‘synesthesia’ if we can stretch the borders of what tableware can do, the eating experience can be enriched in multi-cross-wiring ways.



The tableware we use for eating should not just be a tool for placing food in our mouth, but it should become extensions of our body, challenging our senses even in the moment when the food is still on its way to being consumed. Each of designs have been created to stimulate or train different senses – allowing more than just our taste buds to be engaged in the act and enjoyment of eating as sensorial stimuli, therefore it would lead the way of mindful eating which guides to rediscovering a healthy and joyful relationship with food.

The materials in the design currently compose of metal, plastic and ceramics. Each material possesses its natural temperature, which works in harmony with the intent of the design.  From the thickness of the handle to the volume mass of the spoon, it evokes a different effect. Weight distribution changes according to the thickness and the volume affects the sound vibration. Each of these features is subtle but in combination, they harmonize into enhanced tasty effects. As for the specific workings of the features of the design, it could be understood through the elaboration of the five elements – temperature, color, texture, volume/weight and form.

Jinhyun Jeon



I have recently started a side project of conceptual pieces, ranging from sculptures to installations. Here is the first of the series called Frames. The piece is composed of a simple white frame and is attached to glass windows of Art Center College of Design without any visible fixtures. Putting a frame on an existing windows has a number of interesting phenomenas.



First of all, it passively lures viewers to look where they normally wouldn't have. Secondly, the frame creates a visual trick in exaggerating depth. I've heard people say, "Wow, it looks three dimensional." Obviously, everything you see is. It also helps start a discussion on the definition of "art". As a designer I have always found the fine lines that surround art interesting. Is framing a beautiful, random, and natural composition of branches art? Numerous people have come to me and said "yes" to to that question. I'm still exploring. - Andrew Kim

Andrew Kim

Nuue, originally called Wrapped Garment project, is named after a Korean word means cocoon. 2011



Wrapping synthetic fibre around a desired form such as a wooden mannequin or a board. Through a heating process with pressure, wound fibre transforms itself into a 3-dimensional moulded garment bringing expected and unexpected sculptural silhouettes with flexible texture. The garment can be completed with only unitary fibre and heat. This technique reduces processes of making fabric from fibre, also from fabric to garment such as making/cutting pattern, and sawing. Therefore there is no leftover or wastage of material in this process.



Jungeun has been experimenting and researching unconventional methods of creating garments. Rethinking about the fundamental process of producing a garment has led her to the Nuue project. The conceptual garments and products that have been created through the discovered technique display the potential of this idea and a journey that she will continue to develop

.

Nuue, originally called Wrapped Garment project, is named after a Korean word means cocoon. 2011

This technique reduces processes of making fabric from fibre, also from fabric to garment such as making/cutting pattern, and sewing. Therefore there is no leftover or wastage of material in this process. Jungeun has been experimenting and researching unconventional methods of creating garments. Rethinking the fundamental process of producing a garment  led her to the idea of the Nuue project.



Shota Aoyagi and Jungeun Lee both of Japanese descent, studied together in London and created Studio Koya. Their latest exhibition called “Nuue”, and originally called Wrapped Garment project, is named after a Korean word which means cocoon.It started by wrapping synthetic fiber around  desired form such as a wooden mannequin or a board. Through a heating process with pressure, wound fiber transforms itself into a 3-dimensional moulded garment bringing expected and unexpected sculptural silhouettes with flexible texture. The garment can be complete with only fibre and heat.

Studio koya







ⓒ copyrights 2003-2017 Designersparty, all rights reserved. all material published remains the exclusive copyright of Designersparty.