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Jungwook Kim 2012, Korean ink on Korean paper, 162.5 x 112 cm

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Jungwook Kim 2012, Korean ink on Korean paper, 170 x 116.5 cm

"The silent state of the figures is derived from Jungwook Kim’s way of life. She records every moment of life with her head and mind, and opens herself up to all kinds of forms and methods of life. Like a contemplative and observant poet writing down a line implying thoughts and memories about life, living things, death and people, she delivers her feelings through repetitive brush strokes.

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Jungwook Kim 2010, Korean ink on Korean paper, 168 x 116 cm

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Jungwook Kim 2012, Korean ink on Korean paper, 20 x 20 cm

She thinks and keeps thinking. She covers and keeps covering. She draws and keeps drawing. Like a short line of text can be visualized as all kinds of sensitive images and shapes in one’s head, Jungwook Kim’s work is like a sensitive gift comforting the viewers. She doesn’t have strong likes or dislikes towards the concepts that people tend to define as the opposites, such as beauty and ugliness, good and bad, bright and dark, happiness and anxiety, or comfort and wounds. Jungwook Kim attempts to understand ‘their natural state of being’ and spreads out that very moment of sympathy on paper. Likewise, Jungwook Kim’s unbound way of seeing represents another outlook on the world and gives us a certain shining moment." —Yunkyong Kim

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Jungwook Kim 2009, Korean ink on Korean paper, 162 x 130 cm

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Jungwook Kim 2012, Korean ink on Korean paper, 27 x 21cm

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Jungwook Kim 2008, Korean ink on Korean paper, 162 x 112 cm

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Jungwook Kim 2008, Korean ink on Korean paper, 162 x 111.5 cm

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Jungwook Kim 2008, Korean ink on Korean paper, 145.5 x 129 cm

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Jungwook Kim 2007, Korean ink on Korean paper, 74 x 129 cm

Jungwook Kim was born in Seoul in 1970. She lives and works in Seoul, Korea. She is well known for her ‘black portrait’ series executed in Korean traditional painting technic. The unique sensibility of her painting has already attracted many art people around the world. Jungwook Kim’s art comforts us and we can feel alive by sharing artist’s emotions.

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Face Trace 006, 2012, 24×18.5×21.6㎝, resin, artificial teeth, stainless steel wire, acrylic, aluminum plate, bolt

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Face Trace 001, 2012, 36×22.4×23㎝, resin, artificial teeth, stainless steel wire, acrylic, aluminum plate, bolt

Hyungkoo Lee Solo Exhibition 2012, October 11 ~ November 23, 2012

Gallery Skape is pleased to present the solo exhibition Face Trace of Hyungkoo Lee, the artist who represented the Korean pavilion of Venice Biennial in 2007. Based on the research of physiognomy, Hyungkoo Lee’s new body of work entitled Face Trace is exhibited for the first time in two years. The artist captures his own various facial expressions and intentionally fragments into several parts. By reassembling them according to the studies of physiognomy, he composes totally different figures. Face Trace is created by overlapping skull structures of several human races and different parts of artist’s multiple facial expressions. This process follows the method of facial reconstruction used in forensic science. Positioning himself as the absolutist of creation, being a creator and a creation at the same time, he created virtual figures originated from the reality; referring to the real images to create new images is the process often used in his art making. Although, such transformed figures seem as real people who could exist in the reality. This series Face Trace where the sense of gravity and seriousness is wisely modulated transcends the border between incompleteness and completion. Also it offers the sense of humor and wit that generally lies on Hyungkoo Lee’s art world.

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Lepus Animatus head(muscle attachment), 2015, 85×30.7×27.3cm, pedestal 110x40x40cm, resin, oil paint

An unsettling, bulging eyeball in the intricate mixed-media drawing, A06 (2005-06), greeted viewers at the entrance to “Animatuseum,” Seoul-based Hyungkoo Lee’s New York solo debut. Part cartoon, part scientific study, the image set the tone for the exhibition, which played humor and objectivity off each other, while presenting the findings of the artist’s recent archaeological excavations of pop culture in displays reminiscent of natural history museum dioramas.

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Canis D Animatus(muscle attachment), 2015, 139x96x44.5cm, pedestal 12x140x70cm, resin, glass, oil paint

Distributed throughout Arario’s darkened galleries were examples of Lee’s “Animatus” series (2005-07), wonderfully detailed and realistic skeletons of well-known American cartoon characters, theatrically lit and grouped together in suspended animation. Leading with a spindly right claw and hyper-extended neck is Road Runner in Geococcyx Animatus (2005-06), his beak open mid-“Beep! Beep!” and pursued by the persistent Wile E. Coyote, Canis Latrans Animatus (2005-06). Elsewhere, Jerry flees from a pouncing Tom, and an irate Donald Duck hovers high above his trio of mischievous nephews.

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Anas Df Animatus, 2015, 85.5x88x42.5cm, resin, aluminum sticks, stainless steel wires, springs, oil paint

The fabricated fossils were meticulously crafted in Lee’s workshop out of cast resin after much careful study of actual animal anatomies, preliminary sketches and prototypes, many of which were also on display. Somewhat unexpectedly, the act of translating animations into objects gives these characters a weighty spatial presence, bolstered by the evidentiary authority associated with fossils. Lee’s sculptures make it seem as if the Looney Tunes characters actually walked the earth.

Hyungkoo Lee

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The Choe Show Los Angeles 2017

Long famous for his fine-art work which has garnered the respect, admiration and adulation of institutions, museums, high-profile collections and fans around the world, David Choe is just as competent in front of a camera as he is on a canvas.


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David Choe works with the Lide Foundation In Haiti, 2016

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Public Art at Munich, 2014

Previous to these two network appearances, Choe translated his visual prowess for multi-platinum album covers (Jay-Z & Linkin Park: Collision Course) into directing well-regarded music videos for Dan The Automator (Gorillaz, Deltron 3030) and other musical artists. In addition, Choe provided the voice for the lead character in the breakout Sundance Film Festival hit We Are The Strange (2007) and was an integral part in the beginning days of VICE Media Inc.’s transition from traditional print media into more engaging video work where he collaborated on and conceived of two of the company’s most popular Internet shows: The Vice Guide To Travel and Thumbs Up!, the latter of which he served as the writer, director and star. Additionally, Choe provided further essential involvement in the form of composing music and creating graphics, animations and art campaigns for all the shows he was involved with.

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Asa Akira book cover, 2014

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Scion Concept Car, 2012

Working in multiple forms of media with a deeply engaged audience in the hundreds of thousands, Choe is one of the few fine artists to ever successfully make the jump from the museum world to the media world, with his only two network appearances being the extremely successful and high profile shows Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown (CNN) and VICE (HBO). On the former, Choe was a featured guest and on the latter Choe served as both host and interviewer for multiple episodes; both shows went on to win Emmys that year for Outstanding Informational Series, with each episode that featured Choe being the most watched and commented episodes of that program’s season

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Yellow Armour, 2011

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David Choe cult leader art by Esao Andrews

His popularity and personality are proven to draw audiences. In 2012, Choe was dubbed “the prince of all media” by Howard Stern after appearing on his show where he went on to become one of the year’s most popular new guests; while a documentary about his life (Dirty Hands) became the most attended film at the Los Angeles Film Festival the year it premiered and further garnered multiple sold-out showings at The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York.

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The Happiest Place On Earth, 2009

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2Siamese, Vinyl Toys, 2008

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David Choe, 2007

From comics and books, to apparel and music, to films and television- everything Choe has been a part of has proven its success many times over. And just as Choe proved his commercial viability with his fine-art contributions to a diverse list of clients such as Marvel Comics, DC Comics, Sony Pictures, Fox Searchlight, Warner Brothers, CBS, Converse, Levi’s and Vanity Fair, he is once again proving his commercial viability as an immeasurable asset in other forms of media in front of the camera.

David Choe







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