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According to Lee, colors of celadon are more varied than those of white porcelain. He likes to experiment with different shades of celadon depending on the form and usage of his works, rather than being confined to the traditional celadon color. His favorite Goryeo celadon patterns are the early ones with clear drawings using the sanggam technique. He strives to create sophisticated celadon works with vibrant colors that balances simplicity and touch of drawings.

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The colors, forms, and expression methods of the Goryeo celadon are indeed superior but it is equally important to evolve that style into a new direction that people of our times can relate to. Therefore, Lee’s tableware works have developed in its color, form and patterns in a way that fits naturally into our modern lifestyle. By combining the understanding of traditional potteries and its techniques with that of the modern lifestyle, Lee, Eun Bum is creating the contemporary celadon works of our times.

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He also frequently visits old celadon remains throughout the Korean peninsula to study the broken pieces and how they differ across the regions, continuously studying the different effects of clay & glaze combinations.

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Lee is a superb engineer who advances the techniques of the traditional celadon but he is also a designer who creates objet that blends well into our modern lives. He aims to create the new celadon of our times that combines the sophistication of the lines and elegance of pure celadon. He constantly updates and improves his celadon works, treating it as a living entity that grows and matures.

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I like works that have been created with a great deal of care and effort. I also find witty works interesting, but I prefer works that make me want to keep them by my side because they reflect so much of the love and sincerity of the person who made the work. I am always thankful to the works that are made with love and warmth for the viewers and users.

I hope that my work does the same and try to place my utmost efforts at every moment. I often stroke my daughter’s head, just like my mother did for me. When doing so, I realize that the touch of my mother is the same as mine. I create works with the same heart and the same hands, as if I am praying.

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“Beop Go Chang Sin (法古創新),” the four-character idiom, refers to the spirit of creating the new, based on the old. One must learn the old, yet learn it thoroughly, and one must create what is new, yet it must not be solely new.

If the old is not learned thoroughly, then the essence cannot be ascertained and therefore becomes a fabrication. If the new is created yet is not beneficial, then it becomes trash. I always promise myself to become neither a fabrication nor trash. I also believe that this work must be that of joy. I believe the most important thing as an artist is to work joyfully, for the sake of a happy life. In that way, the positive energy will likely be reflected in my work.

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Lee Eun Bum graduated from department of Ceramics at Hongik University in 1992 and started training in Onggi making. He has been introducing his works in five solo exhibitions as well as many other group exhibitions such as ‘Design & Color’ at the International Ceramic Center at Icheon and “Croisements vers la communication” in Paris hosted by IAC.

His works are part of the permanent collection at Chosun Hwanyo Museum in Gwangju as well as Korean Cultural Center in UK. Today, he is back in his hometown in Eumsung, working away in his self-made studio to create works that are contemporary while respecting and borrowing from the traditions and heritage of Korean pottery techniques.

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Kiwa Console

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Kiwa Console detail

Chulan Kwak asserts that crafts are theoretically the result of ‘a blend of concept and tangible materials.’ From the point of view of craftsmanship, however, such notions arise from intuition. Conceptions of craft and design may stem from the needs and wants of the market, but it is the artist who plays the critical role, lending form. For Kwak, designed objects are more than commercial products for the consumer; rather, they are tangible archives of his personal experiences. This very philosophy is what distinguishes Kwak as an artist among designers.

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Kiwa Desktrays

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Kiwa Desktrays detail

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Kiwa Bench

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Kiwa Bench detail

Recognized by artists from diverse disciplines such as architecture and ceramics, Kwak’s extraordinary work distinguishes itself by his choice of media. The artist’s interdisciplinary approach reveals a dialectical process: crossing many boundaries and inviting organic outcomes through the association of disparate materials.

For Chulan Kwak, his creative practice is the de-contextualization of given frameworks and the formation of entirely new social contexts. The artist picks out minute changes in the mundane and ordinary, and employs them as critical elements for dialog. In this dialectic “form-giving” process of materializing the dematerialized, Kwak takes a step closer to mastering his creative vision of blending logic and intuition.

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Kiwa Vases

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Kiwa Sets

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Kiwa Accessary Box

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Kiwa Tray

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Kiwa Trays

Chulan Kwak graduated with a BFA in Woodworking & Furniture Design from the College of Fine Arts at Hongik University. He then acquired his MFA in Contextual Design at Design Academy Eindhoven in the Netherlands. Upon re-entry, Kwak pursued a career in design. He is currently a faculty member at Sangmyung University.

Kwak has been actively exhibiting since 2011 including solo shows titled (The Next Door Gallery, Seoul Korea, 2011), (Templehof Berlin, Berlin, Germany, 2012), (Stockholmsmassan, Stockholm, Sweden, 2013), and (Les Docks, Paris, France, 2014). Kwak has participated in the group exhibitions (Westergasfabriek, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2010), (Nova Gallery, Eindhoven, Netherlands, 2010), and (Culture Station Seoul 284, Seoul, Korea, 2012), to name a few.

Chulan Kwak

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The white oil lamps created by this Korean ceramist Sung Chul Kim are the result of working with maximized precision. The specimens in his Moon series are based on semi-spheres crafted from wheel-thrown porcelain. Sung Chul Kim deliberately crafts one half larger than the other and then joins the two parts so as to form an oval.

Only after the firing process, when the two parts have fused into one piece, does he remove the projecting material using sandpaper. When lit, Kim’s lamps change their appearance, radiating cozy warmth instead of cool elegance, and their austere shapes take on a soft and flowing quality.

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Oil Lamps, 2014. Porcelain, half matt glaze.

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Oil Lamp Moon, 2014. Porcelain, half matt glaze, 17 × 2 cm.

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Oil Lamps, 2014. Porcelain, half matt glaze.

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Oil Lamps, 2014. Porcelain, half matt glaze.

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Dodecagonal Oil Lamp, 2012. Porcelain, half matt glaze, 9 × 2 cm.

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Dodecagonal Oil Lamp, 2014. Porcelain, half matt glaze, 10 × 5 cm.

Sungchul Kim’s most notable works are oil lamps in the style of Korean moon lamps, which use the reflective properties of glazed porcelain and the structure’s shape to magnify the luminosity of a small flame. Kim’s lamps are made of two wheel-thrown halves placed one on top of the other to create an egg-shaped form.

To ensure a near-perfect appearance, he makes one half larger than the other and sands it down after firing so that it fits the smaller piece exactly. Kim strives to capture the qualities of a river-worn stone in these objects, so that they are various in appearance but perfect unto themselves.







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