User inserted image

Shadowed color - Bowl, Porcelain, Pigment, Marbling, Wheel throwing, 1280℃ Oxidation Firing, Polishing

User inserted image

Shadowed Color - Bowl set, Porcelain, Pigment, Marbling, Wheel throwing, 1280℃ Oxidation Firing, Polishing

User inserted image

Shadowed Color - red cylinder set, Porcelain, Pigment, Marbling, Wheel throwing, 1280℃ Oxidation Firing, Polishing

In Hwa Lee is just as interested in the history of porcelain as she is fascinated by the fact that porcelain tableware has always been considered beautiful objects of daily use. This young ceramist skillfully uses translucence, a result of thin vessel walls, for her elegant creations.

She also mixes her own clay and employs various techniques to obtain different degrees of translucence. By carefully removing layer by layer from the clay body while it is spinning on the potter’s wheel, she crafts vessels whose walls are sometimes a mere 1.5 mm thin. After glazing, the light shining through these extremely thin-walled vessels makes for intensely luminous colors.

User inserted image

Shadowed Color - red cylinder set, Porcelain, Pigment, Marbling, Wheel throwing, 1280℃ Oxidation Firing, Polishing

User inserted image

Series Shadowed Color Bowl, 2014. White porcelain, clay.

User inserted image

Bowl Shadowed Color Yellow Cylinder. White porcelain,clay.

User inserted image

Shadowed White Oil lamp, 2010

User inserted image

Memories of Emotions, Porcelain, Wheel throwing, 1280℃ Reduction firing, Polishing, 2015

User inserted image

Memories of Emotions, Porcelain, Wheel throwing, 1280℃ Reduction firing, Polishing, 2015

User inserted image

Memories of Emotions, Porcelain, Wheel throwing, 1280℃ Reduction firing, Polishing, 2015

User inserted image

Inhwa Lee’s porcelain sets draw from the appearance of traditional Korean ceramics, but place greater emphasis on the malleability and aesthetic possibilities presented by her material. Lee works with a blend of opaque and translucent clay and porcelain to create hand-thrown cylindrical vessels with a marbled appearance.

Once her clay is dry, she works the interior and exterior of each piece to render the walls so fine that light can pass through them. In creating delicate clay vessels that resemble marbled paper and appear to glow from within, Lee pushes her material to its limit and displays its inherent elegance.

User inserted image

Untitled, 2016. Wheel Thrown and hand carved porcelain

This idea of simplicity in ceramics is always an intriguing one for me, especially achieving harmony in both detail and form. I think many view this kind of work as ‘easy’ compared to the more decorative approaches throughout the years, but actually to go this route shows up any imperfections and means that everything must be in order to ensure all elements work harmoniously.

Movie shooting by Hyundai Motors Group, Movie editing by Director.Yoo Ji - Heuk

These porcelain vessels by Korean artist Jong Min Lee are particularly fascinating as he’s given this concept of decoration a new meaning. From afar they have all the hallmarks of those simple vessels created in the Joseon Dynasty, it’s only once you get up-close you notice that they’ve been intricately carved using the smooth porcelain surface as a canvas to convey Min Lee’s concept of nature flowing throughout. The angle of his carving is determined by the direction of the light shining, this creates unique shadows and depths depending on the placement of the piece.

User inserted image

Untitled, 2016. Wheel Thrown and hand carved porcelain

User inserted image

Untitled, 2016. Wheel Thrown and hand carved porcelain

Impressive in all aspects, I find it especially inspiring the amount of effort and time that has gone in to these. Not only does Jong have to make these flowing forms on the pottery wheel, he also has to risk losing these one of a kind pieces that take months to make in the unpredictable firing process. This uplifts them to a whole new stature, but origins of utility are still rooted throughout.

User inserted image

Detail

When seen from a distance, this Korean artist’s porcelain vases evoke the mysterious simplicity characteristic of ceramics created in the Joseon Dynasty (1393–1910). A closer look reveals delicate ornamental patterns on their surfaces, inspired by the potter’s observing nature, such as trees and leaves moving in the wind, small waves breaking on the seashore or calmly flowing waters. Jong-Min Lee wants the beholder to be “profoundly fascinated” by this second level of contemplative insight.

The crafting process is extremely time-consuming. After wheel-throwing his vases and allowing them to dry, he accurately carves the patterns into the surfaces in the course of weeks or even months. Only then does he apply the glazes and fires the vessels in the kiln. Divested of any functionality due to their distinctly narrow openings, his vases present themselves as genuine art objects. This artist also attaches great importance to handcrafting them entirely by himself.

User inserted image

Untitled, 2015. Wheel Thrown and hand carved porcelain, H 42 cm, Ø 22 cm

User inserted image

Untitled, 2015. Wheel Thrown and hand carved porcelain, H 31 cm, Ø 30 cm

I carve a very sensitive pattern onto molded clay. The pattern I carve motivates the viewer's spirit to vibrate. The pattern simulates nature in movement, similar to waves on a lake. The expression of nature in my artwork changes according to the viewing distance of the piece.

When my artwork is viewed from a distance, a serene and tranquil feeling will wash over a veiwer just as a gentle breeze or gentle stream flowing around oneself. If you come close to my artwork you can see the gentleness of nature. My desire is to reflect gentle nature through the impressions of my artwork. From start to finish I persist in making my artwork with the passion of nature at its finest.

Jongmin Lee

User inserted image

Dotted Bird, 2014, 75 x 125 x 42 mm ( W x H x D ), Porcelain

User inserted image

Crowned Bird3, 2015, 150 x 360 x 150 mm ( W x H x D ), Porcelain

User inserted image

Stone Vase1, 2014, 210 x 185 x 140 mm ( W x H x D ) , Porcelain

User inserted image

Hummingbird Jug, 2011, 120 x 87 x 65 mm (W x H x D), Porcelain, Gold Lustre

User inserted image

Mineral Vase White, 2013, 220 x 200 x 90 mm ( W x H x D ), Porcelain

User inserted image

Porcelain Flower Scarlet, 2014, 140 x 210 x 100 mm ( W x H x D ), Porcelain

User inserted image

Chopstick Rest, 2014, 105 x 22 x 85 mm ( W x H x D ), Porcelain

User inserted image

Cauliflower Container, 2015, 150 x 360 x 150 mm ( W x H x D ), Porcelain

User inserted image

Flower Vase, 2007, 260 x 240 x 240 mm ( W x H x D ), Porcelain

User inserted image User inserted image

Sena Gu received her MA on the same subject from the Royal College of Art in 2007. Since then she has become a well respected design-maker (www.sena-gu.com), showing her imaginative creations at exhibitions such as Tent and 100% Design. For our 2007 edition of Do Masters, Sena showed her Lemon Squeezer - a porcelain dish with a “squeezer” in the shape of a lemon (cast in porcelain from the real thing) perched on top.

Sena Gu







ⓒ copyrights 2003-2017 Designersparty, all rights reserved. all material published remains the exclusive copyright of Designersparty.